How to drive the case by asking good questions?

Case Interview
New answer on Apr 30, 2020
6 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Feb 25, 2020

I would like to seek suggestions on "how to ask for data and information to drive the case." Sometimes I get stuck because I do not know how to ask the right question to drive the case in the correct direction.

For instance, below are some questions I might ask. Please provide some feedback and suggestions, thank you!

1. One way the client could increase revenue could be increasing the price, through improving product quality or increasing marketing promotion. ->Do we know the price elasticity of the market?

2. One way the client could increase revenue could be adding a new revenue stream ->Do we know whether the client has considered this option?

3. One way to cut the cost might be decreasing the warehouse rent cost by moving the warehouse to a more rural area. ->Do we know whether this is achievable?

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Anonymous replied on Apr 30, 2020

state the hypothesis and ask for data to prove it.

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Luca
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Content Creator
replied on Feb 25, 2020
BCG |NASA |20+ interviews with 100% success rate| 120+ students coached |GMAT expert 780/800 score

Hello,

You can find below my feedback:

1) Ok

2) I would rather ask if our client is actually willing to consider this option, the historical data is not really important

3) In this case I would focus the attention on the increasing transportation costs and delivery time

Does it make sense?
You should avoid too generic questions. For example, in case 3, you should be the one saying if that's a feasible option or not.

Hope it helps,
Luca

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Antonello
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replied on Feb 29, 2020
McKinsey | MBA professor for consulting interviews

I recommend present more options for each bullet, then - after a justified prioritization - start with the most important one for the first question. In this way they will not appear as random question, but come from a structure

Best,
Antonello

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Nathaniel
Expert
replied on Feb 26, 2020
McKinsey | BCG | CERN| University of Cambridge

Hello there,

I believe the questions you proposed are all valid. What is important is the way you conveyed and communicate the questions.

For example, instead of asking "is this achievable?", you can be more specific by mentioning the elements needed to be assessed to evalaute whether an action is achievable or not. Hence for cutting cost, we might ask, "do we have any data on scenario modelling for moving warehouse to different areas?, "do we have established distribution network which covers the targeted rural area where we want to propose as the new warehouse location?", "do we have enough financial reserve to make such changes?".

Hope it helps.

Kind regards,
Nathan

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Ian
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replied on Feb 26, 2020
BCG | 100% personal interview success rate (8/8) and 95% candidate success rate | Personalized interview prep

You need to picture yourself at the client site, in front of a whiteboard, with your team, figuring out what you need to do next on this project.

Truly reflect on what you need, what you're missing, or what you don't currently understand about the situation. Then, ask questions to fill this in.

This is super hard to learn, and impossible to teach through some written tips/techniques. I'd be happy to give you a crash course in this - 1 hour is all you need to have a complete mindset shift in this area!

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Clara
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replied on Feb 25, 2020
McKinsey | Awarded professor at Master in Management @ IE | MBA at MIT |+180 students coached | Integrated FIT Guide aut

Hello!

I find all those questions good and reasonable.

Taking a step back and getting back to your promp of "how to ask for data and information to drive the case", I believe it´s not so much about the specific question but the approach.

Instead of trying one by one with the questions you wrote, try taking a minute to draft all the options and then build your pitch arround it (e.g., I see X different ways to increase the revenue, such as A, B and C. Pros would be XX and potential risks would be YY. Given this, if we don´t have any further information from the client, I would start exploring option 1 given *and here you give a reason related to what you mentioned before as strenghts or risks*)

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

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