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Sidi

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Exhibits

Hi there

Is there a good resource where I can study complicated exhibits (as they occur in McK interviews)? What's the best way to practice those?

Thanks :))

Hi there

Is there a good resource where I can study complicated exhibits (as they occur in McK interviews)? What's the best way to practice those?

Thanks :))

8 answers

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Hi!

The most important thing is to mentally move away from the complexity on the chart! What I witness with most candidates is that they "get drowned" in the chart, just looking at it in isolation and trying to come up with insights.

The most central questions to always ask yourself is: "What is the question we are trying to answer, which aspect towards answering this question are we now discussing, and what does this chart show that is relevant for this aspect?". Interestingly, I observe again and again that, as soon as the chart is presented to candidates, they oftentimes completely forget about what was discussed in the minute before getting the chart and what led to the interviewer handing it out.

So contextualizing the chart is the single most helpful habit that I would urgently advise to internalize. The "technical" reading of the chart is much less of an issue with most candidates.

Cheers, Sidi

Hi!

The most important thing is to mentally move away from the complexity on the chart! What I witness with most candidates is that they "get drowned" in the chart, just looking at it in isolation and trying to come up with insights.

The most central questions to always ask yourself is: "What is the question we are trying to answer, which aspect towards answering this question are we now discussing, and what does this chart show that is relevant for this aspect?". Interestingly, I observe again and again that, as soon as the chart is presented to candidates, they oftentimes completely forget about what was discussed in the minute before getting the chart and what led to the interviewer handing it out.

So contextualizing the chart is the single most helpful habit that I would urgently advise to internalize. The "technical" reading of the chart is much less of an issue with most candidates.

Cheers, Sidi

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Hi Anonymous!

In addition to the comments given, you can look into McKinsey PST sample tests - they contain also McK-like charts for training.

However, the most important thing is putting the chart and data into context, and having a systematic way of looking at them. Usually I first read the header, afterwards checking e.g. the x- and y-axis description (meaning), before I even look at the first data point to not get lost in details while missing the overall picture.

Hope that helps!

Robert

Hi Anonymous!

In addition to the comments given, you can look into McKinsey PST sample tests - they contain also McK-like charts for training.

However, the most important thing is putting the chart and data into context, and having a systematic way of looking at them. Usually I first read the header, afterwards checking e.g. the x- and y-axis description (meaning), before I even look at the first data point to not get lost in details while missing the overall picture.

Hope that helps!

Robert

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Hi there,

I'd also look at GMAT resources for some of its graphical questions or integrated reasoning

https://magoosh.com/gmat/integrated-reasoning/gmat-integrated-reasoning-graphic-interpretation-practice-questions/

Bryan

Hi there,

I'd also look at GMAT resources for some of its graphical questions or integrated reasoning

https://magoosh.com/gmat/integrated-reasoning/gmat-integrated-reasoning-graphic-interpretation-practice-questions/

Bryan

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I recommend the dedicated books of Cosentino (Case in Point: Graph Analysis for Consulting and Case Interviews)

best,
Antonello

I recommend the dedicated books of Cosentino (Case in Point: Graph Analysis for Consulting and Case Interviews)

best,
Antonello

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Hello!

I struggled with the same thing.

I would strongly recomment you practice it with the Integrated Reasoning part of the GMAT exam.

There are free exams in the internet that you can use for practice (the one of LBS MBA page, Verits prep, as well as some free trials for courses such as the one of The Economist (https://gmat.economist.com/)

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

Hello!

I struggled with the same thing.

I would strongly recomment you practice it with the Integrated Reasoning part of the GMAT exam.

There are free exams in the internet that you can use for practice (the one of LBS MBA page, Verits prep, as well as some free trials for courses such as the one of The Economist (https://gmat.economist.com/)

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

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Hi Anonymous,

I would recommend the following three-step approach to properly read graphs:

1. Read the graph

  • Ask for one minute of time to understand the graph.
  • Summarize what the graph is about. Read in particular the graph title (often forgotten), the axes and the legend.

2. Analyze the graph

  • Repeat the main question you have to answer. Many people don’t spend time to clarify the specific question they have to answer; consequently, they answer the wrong question. Don’t be one of them and be sure to restate what is the main insight you have to derive
  • Provide an analysis related to the question. Once you have a clear understanding of the graph and repeated the objective, then, and only then, you can move to an analysis of how the graph can answer the question you have repeated.

3. Provide a conclusion for the graph.

  • Answer to the question asked. Again, very often people simply state what the graph is about, without providing any conclusion. A great candidate will provide a connection between the analysis done and the previous question formulated, with a clear summary of the whole analysis
  • Present the next steps to follow based on such conclusion. As a last step, a great candidate will present what can be done next to help further the client on the particular question raised.

In terms of material you can use the following to practice:

  • Graphs in Casebooks
  • Graphs in PST and Potential Test
  • GMAT Integrated Reasoning section

Hope this helps,

Francesco

Hi Anonymous,

I would recommend the following three-step approach to properly read graphs:

1. Read the graph

  • Ask for one minute of time to understand the graph.
  • Summarize what the graph is about. Read in particular the graph title (often forgotten), the axes and the legend.

2. Analyze the graph

  • Repeat the main question you have to answer. Many people don’t spend time to clarify the specific question they have to answer; consequently, they answer the wrong question. Don’t be one of them and be sure to restate what is the main insight you have to derive
  • Provide an analysis related to the question. Once you have a clear understanding of the graph and repeated the objective, then, and only then, you can move to an analysis of how the graph can answer the question you have repeated.

3. Provide a conclusion for the graph.

  • Answer to the question asked. Again, very often people simply state what the graph is about, without providing any conclusion. A great candidate will provide a connection between the analysis done and the previous question formulated, with a clear summary of the whole analysis
  • Present the next steps to follow based on such conclusion. As a last step, a great candidate will present what can be done next to help further the client on the particular question raised.

In terms of material you can use the following to practice:

  • Graphs in Casebooks
  • Graphs in PST and Potential Test
  • GMAT Integrated Reasoning section

Hope this helps,

Francesco

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Hi,

Here is my approach:

  1. Ask the interviewer for a minute to analyze the chart / table

  2. In your mind formulate the question you have to answer

  3. Look at the chart and define the type (pie chart, line chart, etc). Read the chart title. Read the legend

  4. Analyze the chart / table. Look for: Trends, comparisons, % shares, etc. Look for unusual things (consultants love to integrate these traps in charts) - correlations, outliers, etc

  5. Ask clarifying questions if required

  6. Provide your conclusion. You should not just describe the chart but also derive the conclusions. There should be at least one major conclusion plus any additional conclusions you can make. You can also provide your hypothesis on what can be the root causes / consequences

  7. Based on the interviewer's feedback, prioritize the most important information and define the next steps.

Here are some tips on how you can master that skill:

  1. Read "Say it with Charts" book by Gene Zelazny

  2. Check the chapters on cases with charts in the following case books "Consulting Bible" and "Vault guide for consulting"

  3. Refresh the basic statistics (Most of GMAT prep handbooks have a good summary)

  4. Practice GMAT Integrated Reasoning part (GMAT Official guide or Manhattan prep)

  5. Practice on real MBB presentations. Look at the chart, derive the conclusions, and compare it to the ones on the slide. Best sources to find presentations - various reports and articles on MBB websites, Slideshare

Best

Hi,

Here is my approach:

  1. Ask the interviewer for a minute to analyze the chart / table

  2. In your mind formulate the question you have to answer

  3. Look at the chart and define the type (pie chart, line chart, etc). Read the chart title. Read the legend

  4. Analyze the chart / table. Look for: Trends, comparisons, % shares, etc. Look for unusual things (consultants love to integrate these traps in charts) - correlations, outliers, etc

  5. Ask clarifying questions if required

  6. Provide your conclusion. You should not just describe the chart but also derive the conclusions. There should be at least one major conclusion plus any additional conclusions you can make. You can also provide your hypothesis on what can be the root causes / consequences

  7. Based on the interviewer's feedback, prioritize the most important information and define the next steps.

Here are some tips on how you can master that skill:

  1. Read "Say it with Charts" book by Gene Zelazny

  2. Check the chapters on cases with charts in the following case books "Consulting Bible" and "Vault guide for consulting"

  3. Refresh the basic statistics (Most of GMAT prep handbooks have a good summary)

  4. Practice GMAT Integrated Reasoning part (GMAT Official guide or Manhattan prep)

  5. Practice on real MBB presentations. Look at the chart, derive the conclusions, and compare it to the ones on the slide. Best sources to find presentations - various reports and articles on MBB websites, Slideshare

Best

Yes. Practice with Case in Point - Graph Analysis for Consulting and Case Interviews. It's a very good book for studying exhibits and charts, and also has sample cases.

Yes. Practice with Case in Point - Graph Analysis for Consulting and Case Interviews. It's a very good book for studying exhibits and charts, and also has sample cases.

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