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Emily

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8

What is the percetage of the people left because of "Up or Out" policy?

Roughly what is the percetage of the people left because of "Up or Out" policy?

Roughly what is the percetage of the people left because of "Up or Out" policy?

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Book a coaching with Emily

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There is no easy or straightforward answer. It is very hard to attribute the actual %, since so many factors would come into play why people leave (note that some leave not because of up-or-out) or why firms let people go.

Even for a single factor, it can play in different ways. Take overall economy in the specific country/region for example - when economy is bad, firms might be more stringent and let go of more people; but when economy is good, that could mean there a lot more external opportunities opening up and more people would voluntarily leave the firm.

Best,

Emily

There is no easy or straightforward answer. It is very hard to attribute the actual %, since so many factors would come into play why people leave (note that some leave not because of up-or-out) or why firms let people go.

Even for a single factor, it can play in different ways. Take overall economy in the specific country/region for example - when economy is bad, firms might be more stringent and let go of more people; but when economy is good, that could mean there a lot more external opportunities opening up and more people would voluntarily leave the firm.

Best,

Emily

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Hi there,

Actually this policy depends on the country and on consulting company.

As far as I know in Italy, but I think in many other EU countries such as Germany, France and Spain is as follow:

  • McK: up or out policy around 20%
  • BCG: not a clear up or out, they help you to improve at certain standard with coaching session. Then if employees do not improve they simply leave the company by themselves to get better opportunity outside
  • Bain: very similar do BCG. Actually you can work as consultant forever. Of course they cut your bonus and very few people stay in the company without stepping up.

For further clarification do not hesitate to contact me in private

Hi there,

Actually this policy depends on the country and on consulting company.

As far as I know in Italy, but I think in many other EU countries such as Germany, France and Spain is as follow:

  • McK: up or out policy around 20%
  • BCG: not a clear up or out, they help you to improve at certain standard with coaching session. Then if employees do not improve they simply leave the company by themselves to get better opportunity outside
  • Bain: very similar do BCG. Actually you can work as consultant forever. Of course they cut your bonus and very few people stay in the company without stepping up.

For further clarification do not hesitate to contact me in private

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Hi,

It really depends on the economy cycle, role, office, etc

  • In 2009 the "Out" rate was super high. You can expect the same now
  • There are lots of outs between analysts and associates, less from associate to manager, even less from manager to AP and then a lot from AP to Partner
  • Particular offices depending on the maturity level can have different pyramid structures

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Hi,

It really depends on the economy cycle, role, office, etc

  • In 2009 the "Out" rate was super high. You can expect the same now
  • There are lots of outs between analysts and associates, less from associate to manager, even less from manager to AP and then a lot from AP to Partner
  • Particular offices depending on the maturity level can have different pyramid structures

Best

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Hello!

Not agree, this totally depends on factors such as tenure and location. On top, also the economic cycle (growth vs. contration or uncertainity) is very determinant, as well as the industry in which the person is specialized -if at all-.

Cheers,

Clara

Hello!

Not agree, this totally depends on factors such as tenure and location. On top, also the economic cycle (growth vs. contration or uncertainity) is very determinant, as well as the industry in which the person is specialized -if at all-.

Cheers,

Clara

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Hi Anonymous,

Even though in detail the reason for leaving is not always that clear, the number you are looking for is around 15-20% for McK in Central European offices.

Why is it not always that clear? If it doesn't work out as expected for any given person, chances are high it's just not the perfect fit from both sides, so many consultants also leave because they want as a consequence of their lacking performance which in turn gives a comparably low job satisfaction.

Hope that helps!

Robert

Hi Anonymous,

Even though in detail the reason for leaving is not always that clear, the number you are looking for is around 15-20% for McK in Central European offices.

Why is it not always that clear? If it doesn't work out as expected for any given person, chances are high it's just not the perfect fit from both sides, so many consultants also leave because they want as a consequence of their lacking performance which in turn gives a comparably low job satisfaction.

Hope that helps!

Robert

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This is indeed very specific to the region, firm, and office, but ballpark 15-20% of people are rated as underperforming. It is difficult to say how many are forced out as there is a very natural flow of people leaving. It also seems that a lot of MBA joiners have the goal to stay for two years and then move on.

This is indeed very specific to the region, firm, and office, but ballpark 15-20% of people are rated as underperforming. It is difficult to say how many are forced out as there is a very natural flow of people leaving. It also seems that a lot of MBA joiners have the goal to stay for two years and then move on.

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Hello,

It strongly depends on the office, but even in McKinsey (the most challenging from this point of view) is not more than 10%.

Best,
Luca

Hello,

It strongly depends on the office, but even in McKinsey (the most challenging from this point of view) is not more than 10%.

Best,
Luca

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Hi,

it depends on the firm, on the office, on the role, and on the period. An order of magnitude can be 10% every year

Best,

Antonello

Hi,

it depends on the firm, on the office, on the role, and on the period. An order of magnitude can be 10% every year

Best,

Antonello