Calculate the area of the meeting room in sqm

Market sizing
New answer on Dec 31, 2020
6 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Nov 21, 2020

Hi! I got an information from previous candidates that he got a question where the interviewer asked him "what is the area of the meeting room in sqm?"

I could not find the best way to use bottom-up or top-bottom cause it was really confusing to segment the parts.

Hope you can help! Thanks!

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Adi
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replied on Nov 21, 2020
Accenture, Deloitte | Precision Case Prep | Experienced Interviewer & Career Coach | 15 years professional experience

Hey, this is not a trick question and sometimes you might get these. Just common sense is enough in this case.. Area= Length x Width of the room or Length ^2 if square room, or if a circular room PixRadius^2...you know the drill :) If you are in the room, be creative, walk to two walls (length and width) and take a rough count of meter long steps.

Otherwise just use your height (in meters) to estimate roughly the length and breadth of the room.

Another similar question for you to try: It takes 6hrs by passenger plane from City A to City B. Whats the distance in KM between the two cities?

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Anonymous A on Nov 22, 2020

Hi Adi! I also got the same thinking with you. But sometimes, interviewer does not allow you to walk/move from your seat. They want to see the thinking structure of yours. If the floor is tiles, maybe we can estimate the length and width of each tile, but what if the floor is covered by the carpet?

Ian
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updated an answer on Nov 21, 2020
MBB | 100% personal interview success rate (8/8) and 95% candidate success rate | Personalized interview prep

Hi there,

Was it the specific meeting room you were in?

First of all, forget bottom-up/top-down. It's helpful to learn both approaches. It's very unhelpful to think, during a case "hmmm, should I use top-down or bottom-up"

You need to use the approach that just makes sense!

Here, it's clearly a bottom-up approach (again, don't need to worry about knowing that). You calculate sqm by multiplying width by length...so...you needed to literally just figure out the width of the room and the length. You could use your steps, height, etc as a proxy for a set # of meters. Then, multiply that out by how much remaining length/width was left.

(edited)

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Udayan
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replied on Nov 21, 2020
Top rated McKinsey Case & PEI coach/Multiple real offers/McKinsey EM in New York /6 years McKinsey recruiting experience

If this is the meeting room you are currently in you just have to estimate length and width and multiply it is not that complicated...

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Anonymous A on Nov 22, 2020

Hi Udayan! I know its all about estimating. But, how is the structure to estimate the length and width? I mean.. what is the foundation of you stating the length and width? comparing to the other guesstimate cases where you started from the demand/supply.

(edited)

Udayan on Nov 22, 2020

What I do is - I know my height which is 6'3 so I think how many people like me can lie down in the length and the width and use that as an estimate. As long as you can compare to a known length you can always estimate.

Henning
Expert
replied on Nov 22, 2020
Bain | passed >15 MBB interviews as a candidate

Funny interview question. Was this referring to the room the candidate was in?

Tbh I don't think this is a trick question. But I also have no clue what valuable information an interviewer would draw from that beyond the candidate's ability to estimate width and length of a room and multiplying two single-digit numbers...

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Gaurav
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updated an answer on Nov 22, 2020
Ex-Mckinsey|Certified Career Coach |Placed 500+ candidates at MBB & other consultancies

Hi there! I agree that it was not a tricky question. The best way to solve it it`s just to walk around and count. One big step is approximately 1 meter.
Then just multiply the length by the width.
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GB

(edited)

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Antonello
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replied on Dec 31, 2020
McKinsey | MBA professor for consulting interviews

Hi, in addition to the solutions proposed by the other coaches in the discussion, I would like to suggest similar cases in the platform to practice with:

  • https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-much-would-you-charge-to-clean-all-the-windows-in-seattle-4965
  • https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/market-sizing-milk-consumption-5087
  • https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-would-you-calculate-the-value-of-a-cow-4982
  • https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/estimate-number-of-traffic-lights-in-a-london-5692

Hope it helps,
Antonello

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Adi gave the best answer

Adi

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Accenture, Deloitte | Precision Case Prep | Experienced Interviewer & Career Coach | 15 years professional experience
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