BCG Final round - unanimity or majority decision

BCG Final Round
New answer on Mar 22, 2021
5 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Mar 21, 2021

Hello,

I had my final round for BCG (US) on Friday as an experienced hire (SA/C role - ADP + 1 year in Oliver Wyman).

My first round with Partners and Principals went really well with no negative feedback (which matched my perception - having done the job for a year I feel I can gauge the quality of the conversation to some extent)

My final round had 1 principal interview and two managing director Partner interviews. The principal interview felt very positive, and so did the last MDP, from whom I also received compliments for my background stories and case lead and structure. Overall I really clocked with the last MDP

However, my second interview could have been a lot better - it was not bad, just plain average.

I was told they would tell me on Monday and I know it is a short wait and I am not really asking for a prediction. But I would be interested in understanding the process.

I understand HR will collect feedback and relay? But I have seen mixed messages online on whether it has to be a unanimous decision or 2 vs 1 would suffice (with the 1 of course not having any major red-flag/totally bombing anything)?

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Norah
Expert
replied on Mar 21, 2021
I am here to get you an offer! | Ex MBB interviewer | Expert in MBB and Tier 2 | Deep knowledge of EU and GCC regions

Hello Anonymous,
Thank you for the message. I understand waiting for an answer can be daunting.
My advice is to try top focus on something else while waiting for the outcome.
In reality, the debrief after each round is standard: each interviewer provides detailed feedback and then 3 options exist:
1. Consensus on a positive outcome: you get the offer
2. Debate between the interviewers: here it's a factual debate on the 5-6 criteria. They also take into account the last rounds and if the areas for development were the same (for example, if during the 3 rounds, you made a calculation mistake, then it's a no go)
There is no mathematical way to address this: every case is different. And for example, if the office had reached the quotas of A/Cs they should recruit, then they might be more demanding and selective.

3. Consensus on a negative outcome: in case we see a weak performance and a weak potential to evolve in the firm.
I hope that helps - try to focus on something else during these days and best of luck,
Norah

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Ian
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Content Creator
replied on Mar 21, 2021
MBB | 100% personal interview success rate (8/8) and 95% candidate success rate | Personalized interview prep

Hi there,

I totally understand the desire to have a sense of control here and predict the outcome! I would advise against this sort of thiking (there's really no benefit to it) BUT I'll also humour you here as I know it helps :)

It is a unanimous decision. So, while one Partner may not have loved you, if they think you're decent, and the others present a strong case for you, they would likely make an offer. However, at the end of the day this is all people dynamics and "politics". The one who doesn't like you has to be acquiesent enough to agree. Or be a less vocal individual. Or have less soft power. The ones who like you have to be vocal and feel strongly about you.

Only time will tell what will play out. It's a coin flip it sounds like. Fingers crossed for you!

P.S. I know people who think they aced an interview and compeltely bombed it, and others who think they bombed it who aced it. In general, people are not as good judges of their own performance as they think!

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Allen
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replied on Mar 21, 2021
Ex-McK Experienced Hire and EM - I show you how to perform at your best

Hi there,

When I was at McKinsey, these of conversations (called decision meetings) were typically consensus-based. In other words, although each interviewer would complete a form assessing your performance based on the objective criteria, ulimately, it came down to "what do we think as a group?"

Therefore, if two of them really liked you, and one sort-of did, the likely conversation is "Do we want to hire someone who wasn't consistent across all three? How much did you two like him?" This is simlar to the term you used, "majority decision."

Bottom line, if you made a great impression on those two, your chances are very good! This is especially true if you did extremely well with one of the two. I'm feeling your chances are very good!

Best of luck,

Allen

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Gaurav
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Content Creator
replied on Mar 21, 2021
Ex-Mckinsey|Certified Career Coach |Placed 500+ candidates at MBB & other consultancies

Hey there!

Understanding the process probably will not help you to deal with the nervous. However, there might be several different ways of how the whole thing goes but in general its a completely unanimous decision. So, if you do think that at least two interviews went very well - you have pretty good chances to get an offer.

Fingers Crossed!

GB

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Clara
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Content Creator
replied on Mar 22, 2021
McKinsey | Awarded professor at Master in Management @ IE | MBA at MIT |+180 students coached | Integrated FIT Guide aut

Hello!

I imagine how nervous you must be :) We will keep our fingers crossed.

It´s impossible to forecast, but what I can tell you is that the decision needs to be unanimous.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

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Norah gave the best answer

Norah

I am here to get you an offer! | Ex MBB interviewer | Expert in MBB and Tier 2 | Deep knowledge of EU and GCC regions
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