Cookie and Privacy Settings

This website uses cookies to enable essential functions like the user login and sessions. We also use cookies and third-party tools to improve your surfing experience on preplounge.com. You can choose to activate only essential cookies or all cookies. You can always change your preference in the cookie and privacy settings. This link can also be found in the footer of the site. If you need more information, please visit our privacy policy.

Data processing in the USA: By clicking on "I accept", you also consent, in accordance with article 49 paragraph 1 sentence 1 lit. GDPR, to your data being processed in the USA (by Google LLC, Facebook Inc., LinkedIn Inc., Stripe, Paypal).

Manage settings individually I accept
expert
Expert with best answer

Allen

100% Recommendation Rate

46 Meetings

781 Q&A Upvotes

USD 259 / Coaching

11

What are the consequences of declining a MBB job offer?

Dear all,

I am curious to understand the dynamics behind turning down a MBB offer. Can the candidate, after declining the offer, be reconsidered in the future or still maintain contacts with the firm? Or is there a sort of red cross over his/her name?

Plus, is it better to decline a final job offer or to temporarly interrupt the recruiting process without doing the final round?

Thank you!

Dear all,

I am curious to understand the dynamics behind turning down a MBB offer. Can the candidate, after declining the offer, be reconsidered in the future or still maintain contacts with the firm? Or is there a sort of red cross over his/her name?

Plus, is it better to decline a final job offer or to temporarly interrupt the recruiting process without doing the final round?

Thank you!

11 answers

  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Best Answer
Book a coaching with Allen

100% Recommendation Rate

46 Meetings

781 Q&A Upvotes

USD 259 / Coaching

Hi there,

I doubt there are formal policies on this but here's my take from my time in recruiting.

If MBB thinks highly enough of you to make you an offer, declining the offer won't change that and they'd be happy to "take you back" if you return in the future. The same thing should apply if you have a strong performance early in the process and then drop out.

With two caveats:

1) everything is done professionally. Meaning you don't just ghost them or give the impression that you never seriously considered accepting the offer and were just interviewing to see if you could get it

2) You have a good story as to why you declined and why you are now coming back. This is pretty easy and almost anything that makes sense will do. Examples: a) I wanted to help my family business or b) take some personal time or c) take another opportunity which wouldn't be available in the future and now that I've done that I'd love to work for MBB to achieve my original goals.

As for the other question, I'd say it's better to complete the process. Once you receive an offer, you're in higher standing so MBB is more likley to take you back. Again, as long as you don't give the impression that you're wasting their time.

Hope that helps!

Allen

Hi there,

I doubt there are formal policies on this but here's my take from my time in recruiting.

If MBB thinks highly enough of you to make you an offer, declining the offer won't change that and they'd be happy to "take you back" if you return in the future. The same thing should apply if you have a strong performance early in the process and then drop out.

With two caveats:

1) everything is done professionally. Meaning you don't just ghost them or give the impression that you never seriously considered accepting the offer and were just interviewing to see if you could get it

2) You have a good story as to why you declined and why you are now coming back. This is pretty easy and almost anything that makes sense will do. Examples: a) I wanted to help my family business or b) take some personal time or c) take another opportunity which wouldn't be available in the future and now that I've done that I'd love to work for MBB to achieve my original goals.

As for the other question, I'd say it's better to complete the process. Once you receive an offer, you're in higher standing so MBB is more likley to take you back. Again, as long as you don't give the impression that you're wasting their time.

Hope that helps!

Allen

(edited)

Book a coaching with Adi

100% Recommendation Rate

47 Meetings

4,189 Q&A Upvotes

USD 149 / Coaching

Hey.

No consequences.

If you have made up your mind, do it without any delays to save time & effort for both parties.

Have a good reason to back up your decision and explain to HR (ideally over phone) and write to the hiring manager directly. Thank them for the opportunity.

If you can, offer to recommend/refer someone you know who could fit the role. Show them this was a hard decision and that you definitely would like to keep in touch for future opportunites. People cross paths unexpectedly and you want absolutely no misunderstanding or confusion in their mind. Keep your brand image clean :).

All the best.

Hey.

No consequences.

If you have made up your mind, do it without any delays to save time & effort for both parties.

Have a good reason to back up your decision and explain to HR (ideally over phone) and write to the hiring manager directly. Thank them for the opportunity.

If you can, offer to recommend/refer someone you know who could fit the role. Show them this was a hard decision and that you definitely would like to keep in touch for future opportunites. People cross paths unexpectedly and you want absolutely no misunderstanding or confusion in their mind. Keep your brand image clean :).

All the best.

Book a coaching with Henning

100% Recommendation Rate

140 Meetings

4,079 Q&A Upvotes

USD 169 / Coaching

From personal experience I can tell you it doesn't closed doors for good. I've receveid a second offer from one of the MBBs after I had turned them down earlier (same local recruiting team).

And I fully agree with the other coaches. You'll need to be professional about your decisions and treat them with respect when doing so.

From personal experience I can tell you it doesn't closed doors for good. I've receveid a second offer from one of the MBBs after I had turned them down earlier (same local recruiting team).

And I fully agree with the other coaches. You'll need to be professional about your decisions and treat them with respect when doing so.

(edited)

Book a coaching with Clara

100% Recommendation Rate

50 Meetings

12,376 Q&A Upvotes

USD 229 / Coaching

Hello!

A priori, nothing happens, as long as you then dont regret the decision ;)

To your 2nd question, is better to stop the process. You won´t take it from there in case you want to interview again, but having reached certain phases would be beneficial for you.

Best regards,

Clara

Hello!

A priori, nothing happens, as long as you then dont regret the decision ;)

To your 2nd question, is better to stop the process. You won´t take it from there in case you want to interview again, but having reached certain phases would be beneficial for you.

Best regards,

Clara

Book a coaching with Francesco

100% Recommendation Rate

3,275 Meetings

11,930 Q&A Upvotes

USD 429 / Coaching

Hi there,

I agree with the other comments. There are no direct consequences, however:

  1. You need to decline the offer in a professional way
  2. You need to have a valid reason to decline

If you check these two boxes, there shouldn't be any issue if you reapply after some time.

If you already know you are not going to accept the offer, I would recommend dropping from the process before the final round.

Best,

Francesco

Hi there,

I agree with the other comments. There are no direct consequences, however:

  1. You need to decline the offer in a professional way
  2. You need to have a valid reason to decline

If you check these two boxes, there shouldn't be any issue if you reapply after some time.

If you already know you are not going to accept the offer, I would recommend dropping from the process before the final round.

Best,

Francesco

Book a coaching with Vlad

97% Recommendation Rate

404 Meetings

11,348 Q&A Upvotes

USD 239 / Coaching

Hi,

I doubt that there will be any consequences. This is especially the case since your market value only grows overtime. In the future you'll have more experience and will be ven more valuable for the company. Just make sure you decline the offer professionally and provide the rationale for that.

If the rationale is another MBB company, you should say it directly. They'll find out anyway

Best

Hi,

I doubt that there will be any consequences. This is especially the case since your market value only grows overtime. In the future you'll have more experience and will be ven more valuable for the company. Just make sure you decline the offer professionally and provide the rationale for that.

If the rationale is another MBB company, you should say it directly. They'll find out anyway

Best

Book a coaching with Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

193 Meetings

16,173 Q&A Upvotes

USD 289 / Coaching

There really aren't consequences! As long as you handle it in a respectable way (i.e. with ample notice, with a reasonable reason, and NOT after having already signed) then you will be just fine.

Just make sure to keep the doors open by declining in a professional and courteous manner!

If you're looking to re-apply a few years down the line you actually should have an advantage over other candidates NOT a disadvantage.

There really aren't consequences! As long as you handle it in a respectable way (i.e. with ample notice, with a reasonable reason, and NOT after having already signed) then you will be just fine.

Just make sure to keep the doors open by declining in a professional and courteous manner!

If you're looking to re-apply a few years down the line you actually should have an advantage over other candidates NOT a disadvantage.

Book a coaching with Udayan

98% Recommendation Rate

94 Meetings

2,724 Q&A Upvotes

USD 209 / Coaching

Allen's answer is spot on.

I think if you have a very valid reason for why you are declining the offer (for example a ver important personal situation changing) then you will be fine.

Allen's answer is spot on.

I think if you have a very valid reason for why you are declining the offer (for example a ver important personal situation changing) then you will be fine.

Book a coaching with Antonello

99% Recommendation Rate

142 Meetings

4,795 Q&A Upvotes

USD 219 / Coaching

Hi,

There's no red cross, blacklisting, etc.

I know plenty of candidates who declined and then joined (even after years).

I think it's great to keep in touch if you think is interesting for you and them.

I'd go through the whole process before interrupting it. Great learning experience for you, and maybe you'll even change your mind.

Hope this helps.

Best,

Antonello

Hi,

There's no red cross, blacklisting, etc.

I know plenty of candidates who declined and then joined (even after years).

I think it's great to keep in touch if you think is interesting for you and them.

I'd go through the whole process before interrupting it. Great learning experience for you, and maybe you'll even change your mind.

Hope this helps.

Best,

Antonello

Book a coaching with Gaurav

100% Recommendation Rate

194 Meetings

4,931 Q&A Upvotes

USD 209 / Coaching

Hi there,

it's a common practice and there is nothing wrong about declining an offer. Make sure to let them know your decision in time, make it personally (better on the phone), reach out to the HR (and may be a partner) and explain them your situation. If you do everything professionally, you stay in contact and leave the doors open, there is always a second chance.

For your second question, I think it's better not to interrupt the recruiting process, but to decline an already existing job offer. At least that's how they really know what you're capable of and if they want you.

Hope it helps,

Cheers,

GB

Hi there,

it's a common practice and there is nothing wrong about declining an offer. Make sure to let them know your decision in time, make it personally (better on the phone), reach out to the HR (and may be a partner) and explain them your situation. If you do everything professionally, you stay in contact and leave the doors open, there is always a second chance.

For your second question, I think it's better not to interrupt the recruiting process, but to decline an already existing job offer. At least that's how they really know what you're capable of and if they want you.

Hope it helps,

Cheers,

GB

Book a coaching with Iman

100% Recommendation Rate

16 Meetings

1,501 Q&A Upvotes

USD 159 / Coaching

Hi,

It really depends on the way you decline. Obviously you need to communicate it well, have a strong reason and demonstrate that you are open to keep in touch.

If it is done properly, I would not expect a negative consequences. Regarding your question about the timing, do it as early as possible if you already set your mind.

Best,
Iman

Hi,

It really depends on the way you decline. Obviously you need to communicate it well, have a strong reason and demonstrate that you are open to keep in touch.

If it is done properly, I would not expect a negative consequences. Regarding your question about the timing, do it as early as possible if you already set your mind.

Best,
Iman

Related case(s)

MBB Final Round Case - Smart Education

Solved 15.3k times
MBB Final Round Case - Smart Education Our client is SmartBridge, a nonprofit educational institution offering face-to-face tutoring services. The client operates in the US. The mission of SmartBridge is to help as many students as possible to complete studies and prevent that they drop from the school system, in particular in disadvantaged areas. The client is considering starting operations for its services in the Chicago area. They hired us to understand if that makes sense. Due to the nonprofit regulation, SmartBridge should operate on its own in the market, without any partnership. How would you help our client?
4.6 5 528
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

Our client is SmartBridge, a nonprofit educational institution offering face-to-face tutoring services. The client operates in the US. The mission of SmartBridge is to help as many students as possible to complete studies and prevent that they drop from the school system, in particular in disadvant ... Open whole case

Espresso, Whatelse?

Solved 9.0k times
Espresso, Whatelse? Espresso Whatelse is an Italian company that produces coffee and espresso machines since 1908. It is the Italian market leader and has a strong presence overall in Europe. In 2019, Espresso Whatelse has increased its revenues but it has seen declining profit margin. Your client wants to understand the root causes of this 2019 trend and how to increase its profit margin again.  
4.6 5 455
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

Espresso Whatelse is an Italian company that produces coffee and espresso machines since 1908. It is the Italian market leader and has a strong presence overall in Europe. In 2019, Espresso Whatelse has increased its revenues but it has seen declining profit margin. Your client wants to understand ... Open whole case

Hot Wheels

Solved 4.8k times
Hot Wheels Problem definition: Our client is Korean Car Parts (KCP), a multi-national original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of car parts based in Korea. They've recently seen a decline in profits and have brought us in to understand how to address this falling profitability.
4.6 5 284
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

Problem definition: Our client is Korean Car Parts (KCP), a multi-national original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of car parts based in Korea. They've recently seen a decline in profits and have brought us in to understand how to address this falling profitability. Open whole case

Chinese Chess - Airline Business During COVID-19

Solved 3.3k times
Chinese Chess - Airline Business During COVID-19 Sky China, a government-backed Chinese airline, has recently seen profits plummet due to COVID-19. Profits are down 80% in the months of February and March, but are showing early signs of a rebound in April.  They've brought you in to first investigate what can be done immediatedly to prevent hemorrhaging cash and surive in the short-term. They are also looking to see how the current situation can be viewed as an opportunity, and what can be done to prepare for the future. 
4.3 5 102
| Rating: (4.3 / 5.0)

Sky China, a government-backed Chinese airline, has recently seen profits plummet due to COVID-19. Profits are down 80% in the months of February and March, but are showing early signs of a rebound in April. They've brought you in to first investigate what can be done immediatedly to prevent hemor ... Open whole case

Coronavirus Times - COVID-19 Brainteaser

Solved 3.0k times
Coronavirus Times - COVID-19 Brainteaser You and your family are faced with a challenging set of decisions. Due to coronavirus, your partner has taken a 20% paycut and you are worried you may lose your job. In addition, while daycare is still open, you are worried that sending your two children there will increase the risk of them bringing the virus back to your house, where your elderly grandparents are also staying. How would you go about thinking about this problem, and what would you recommend?
4.6 5 36
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)
Difficulty: Beginner | Style: Brain Teaser | Topics: Brain teaser

You and your family are faced with a challenging set of decisions. Due to coronavirus, your partner has taken a 20% paycut and you are worried you may lose your job. In addition, while daycare is still open, you are worried that sending your two children there will increase the risk of them bringing ... Open whole case