Sending interviewer self-assessment in email post interview.

Bain & Company
New answer on May 06, 2020
10 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Feb 28, 2020

What is your opinion on if I should do this or not? I know it is unconventional but I try to live my life with transparency and genunity

Immediately post interview I like to document my self assessment so I can establish what I think I did well vs. need to improve while the memory is fresh.

Why I am thinking of sharing this with my interviewer? I think it is a good idea because (1) demonstrates self-awarness which is a very valuable skill for any employee to have regardless of profession and the starting point for improvement / trainability. I think a company that emphasises a focus on their people wil respond posivitely to this (2) I may be able to subtly influence by framing any mistakes in their magnitude - those that were tiny vs less so

Why I hesitate: (1) may risk pointing out errors they didnt realise (2) may fail to point out an error that they registered and I did not - but if that's the case, they may not pass me for that error in the first place

Thoughts?

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Emily
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replied on May 06, 2020
BCG Project Leader | 3+ years interview experience for BCG SEA recruiting | Kellogg MBA, NTU, Peking University

As a previous interviewer, I would say don't do this. Frankly I would't read such email. I would just write up the evaluation based on my assessment during the interview. I wouldn't take your additional points outside the interview, as this won't be fair for other interviewees. Plus, if the interviewee's assessment is not in line with mine, I would actually think the interviewee doesn't have a good self awareness...so it could end up as a risk that backfires.

If you really want to send something, send a thank you note and politely ask for feedback (without your self-assessment).

Best,

Emily

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Nathaniel
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replied on Mar 01, 2020
McKinsey | BCG | CERN| University of Cambridge

Hello there,

I see you have a good reflective habit here, do keep it up.
As for sharing this with the interviewer, it might not be the best move as they usually moves quickly after an interview is done and decide on how a candidate is performing.

Trying to send a self-assessment with the hope to somehow influenced this decision (even if this is not your intention but may be deduced so by some interviewers), may backfire.

The best thing now is too reflect on this thing, share the points with your coaching buddy from the firm if you have one, or the ones you know are working there but do not interview you directly to learn from it and prepare better for next stage or opportunities.

Hope it helps.

Kind regards,
Nathan

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Udayan
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updated an answer on Feb 28, 2020
Top rated MBB coach with many offers /Ex McKinsey EM in New York /6 years McKinsey recruiting experience/Real cases

You have to live life as you see best. My advice to you is to avoid sending such a mail. The reason being that while there is a chance it may be viewed in a good light, there is a higher chance it may be viewed negatively. For example - you may have assessed yourself as having done very well in an interview while the interviewer might have a different opinion or vice versa. Neither scenario will help. It also may have all sorts of implications on your judgment of their interviewing performance. Somewhat like telling your professor how you did on an exam while waiting for them to grade you on it.

I would recommend you talk about your interaction with the interviewer and what you learned from it rather than focus on the assessment of your performance.

(edited)

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Ian
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replied on Feb 28, 2020
BCG | 100% personal interview success rate (8/8) and 95% candidate success rate | Personalized interview prep

Ultimately you do you (and sometimes the unconventional works). However, I see this as a high risk no-reward proposition here.

In my view, if they were going to move you forward, maybe they won't now. If they weren't going to, this won't change their mind.

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Anonymous replied on Apr 30, 2020

don't do that - you might leave a wrong impression and misunderstood.

if you want to send smt - send "thank you" email;)

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Luca
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replied on Feb 28, 2020
BCG |NASA |20+ interviews with 100% success rate| 120+ students coached |GMAT expert 780/800 score

Hello,

The real question is: why should you do it?
The interviewer has probably already done your feedback and anyway has already clear in his mind if you should pass the round or not.
In my opinion, it's just an high risk initiative that I would avoid.

Best,
Luca

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Clara
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replied on Feb 29, 2020
McKinsey | Awarded professor at Master in Management @ IE | MBA at MIT |+180 students coached | Integrated FIT Guide aut

Hello!

I don´t agree with the potential downsides that you are pointing out -for sure you are not going to make them realize things that they hadn´t before-, but I don´t see any advantages either. I would find it very very weird as an interviewer, and quite "desperate"

Cheers,

Clara

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Francesco
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replied on Feb 29, 2020
#1 Expert for Coaching Sessions (3.700+) | 1.300+ Reviews with 100% Recommendation Rate | Ex BCG | 8+ Years of Coaching

Hi Anonymous,

as mentioned in the other comments, I don’t see advantages in sending your self-assessment. The interviewers have already made their decision and:

  • If they decided against you, this won’t convince them
  • If they were positive on moving you to the next round, this could create doubts

Thus there is no advantage in sending the email, and possibly a negative effect.

Hope this helps,
Francesco

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Antonello
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replied on Feb 29, 2020
McKinsey | MBA professor for consulting interviews

Hi, I recommend avoiding, it's risky and does not add value to your performance. Let's wait for the interviewer's feedback and cross the fingers. Only then you can start a discussion with the HR/interviewer to better understand your improvement aspects to structure a plan to crack them in the next opportunity.

Best,
Antonello

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Vlad
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replied on Feb 28, 2020
McKinsey / Accenture Alum / Got all BIG3 offers / Harvard Business School

Hi,

The question is - what are you trying to achieve? And the bigger question - how is living a life with transparency and genuity related to sending an interviewer your notes?

Let me frame it differently: Would you send a note to the client after the meeting, pointing out all your flaws (that the client might not have noticed). What will be the client's reaction? What will be the partner's reaction if you send this note to the client being an analyst?

Best

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Emily gave the best answer

Emily

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BCG Project Leader | 3+ years interview experience for BCG SEA recruiting | Kellogg MBA, NTU, Peking University
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