Cookie and Privacy Settings

This website uses cookies to enable essential functions like the user login and sessions. We also use cookies and third-party tools to improve your surfing experience on preplounge.com. You can choose to activate only essential cookies or all cookies. You can always change your preference in the cookie and privacy settings. This link can also be found in the footer of the site. If you need more information, please visit our privacy policy.

Data processing in the USA: By clicking on "I accept", you also consent, in accordance with article 49 paragraph 1 sentence 1 lit. GDPR, to your data being processed in the USA (by Google LLC, Facebook Inc., LinkedIn Inc., Stripe, Paypal).

Manage settings individually I accept
expert
Expert with best answer

Denis

100% Recommendation Rate

94 Meetings

1,956 Q&A Upvotes

USD 169 / Coaching

9

Mck: Failed 2 times, should I bother a 3rd time?

Hello,

I applied to McK two times already: 1st time I got to the 2nd round of interviews, 2nd time I failed at the Imbellus. Should I bother applying a 3rd time? Anyone heard of people applying 3 times and being succesful then? My ban of 12 months will end soon. I am having mixed feeling between giving a last try and maybe thinking about alternative career options.

Thanks a lot for the feedback

Hello,

I applied to McK two times already: 1st time I got to the 2nd round of interviews, 2nd time I failed at the Imbellus. Should I bother applying a 3rd time? Anyone heard of people applying 3 times and being succesful then? My ban of 12 months will end soon. I am having mixed feeling between giving a last try and maybe thinking about alternative career options.

Thanks a lot for the feedback

9 answers

  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Best Answer
Book a coaching with Denis

100% Recommendation Rate

94 Meetings

1,956 Q&A Upvotes

USD 169 / Coaching

Depends on how badly you want it. If you want it badly, go above and beyond to prep.

If you intend to do so, I d try to minimize entry hurldes (i.e. apply for internship vs. full-time since there will be fewer interviews you have to pass) and stack up on achievements (e.g. MBA).

Since it has not worked already 2 times, I d intentionally try to step away from however you prepared before and get professional (!!) advice as early as possible. This will likely result in a lot of time needed for prep (3 months at the minimum) and money (best coaches you can afford

Best,
Denis

Depends on how badly you want it. If you want it badly, go above and beyond to prep.

If you intend to do so, I d try to minimize entry hurldes (i.e. apply for internship vs. full-time since there will be fewer interviews you have to pass) and stack up on achievements (e.g. MBA).

Since it has not worked already 2 times, I d intentionally try to step away from however you prepared before and get professional (!!) advice as early as possible. This will likely result in a lot of time needed for prep (3 months at the minimum) and money (best coaches you can afford

Best,
Denis

Book a coaching with Florian

100% Recommendation Rate

160 Meetings

4,569 Q&A Upvotes

USD 209 / Coaching

Hey there,

Unfortunate to hear. If you want to work at McKinsey, you should definitely re-apply. However, keep in mind that whenever you (re)-apply after a failed application (screening, aptitude test, or interviews) you need to make sure to show significant development in your resume since your rejection:

  • New academic achievements (e.g., new degree, top of class GPA, other achievements,...)
  • Experience abroad (career or university)
  • New job experience (internships, working student, project assistant,...)
  • New extracurriculars (leadership experience, NGOs, student clubs,....)

Referrals can help both

  • shorten the ban period
  • increase your chances for a new invitation to the interviews

Now, in your case, you already did this once so it might be difficult to make a positive case and argue for a 3rd invitation. Did you significantly change your profile over the last years?

I'd place a lot of weight on networking and referrals in your situation!

All the best!

Cheers,

Florian

Hey there,

Unfortunate to hear. If you want to work at McKinsey, you should definitely re-apply. However, keep in mind that whenever you (re)-apply after a failed application (screening, aptitude test, or interviews) you need to make sure to show significant development in your resume since your rejection:

  • New academic achievements (e.g., new degree, top of class GPA, other achievements,...)
  • Experience abroad (career or university)
  • New job experience (internships, working student, project assistant,...)
  • New extracurriculars (leadership experience, NGOs, student clubs,....)

Referrals can help both

  • shorten the ban period
  • increase your chances for a new invitation to the interviews

Now, in your case, you already did this once so it might be difficult to make a positive case and argue for a 3rd invitation. Did you significantly change your profile over the last years?

I'd place a lot of weight on networking and referrals in your situation!

All the best!

Cheers,

Florian

Book a coaching with Francesco

100% Recommendation Rate

3,414 Meetings

15,746 Q&A Upvotes

USD 449 / Coaching

Hi there,

It really depends on your goal and timeline to achieve it – just like in a case.

If McKinsey still represents the best way to reach your goal (whatever it is - partner position, credibility for fundraising for your own company, industry move, PE, etc) there is no reason to give up. I know people who have been rejected twice that have been invited for 3rd time, so you definitely have a chance.

Unless you are focused on McKinsey only, I would also apply to Bain and BCG – it is always risky to apply to one single company only.

Keep in mind that for most people MBB is a way to reach another goal. If you can go there directly, no reasons to join MBB. There are a lot of very successful people who never worked there.

Best,

Francesco

Hi there,

It really depends on your goal and timeline to achieve it – just like in a case.

If McKinsey still represents the best way to reach your goal (whatever it is - partner position, credibility for fundraising for your own company, industry move, PE, etc) there is no reason to give up. I know people who have been rejected twice that have been invited for 3rd time, so you definitely have a chance.

Unless you are focused on McKinsey only, I would also apply to Bain and BCG – it is always risky to apply to one single company only.

Keep in mind that for most people MBB is a way to reach another goal. If you can go there directly, no reasons to join MBB. There are a lot of very successful people who never worked there.

Best,

Francesco

Book a coaching with Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

267 Meetings

23,176 Q&A Upvotes

USD 289 / Coaching

Hi there,

I have two philosophies (of far too many) that I live by:

1) Future Regret Minimization

2) The greatest accomplishments come from temporary defeat

In terms of #1 What will you regret more in the future? Having tried a 3rd time (and, for the sake of this exercise, failed)? Or, not having tried a 3rd time? Think 2, 3, 4, 5 years down the road. What will you regret?

In terms of #2, I can't tell you how many people I've met who are at their lowest of lowest, failure after failure after failure, who finally "hit it big". If you dream you can achieve.

All this said, may not hurt to do the following:

1) Hire a coach for 1 session. Ask them to tell you, completely and honestly, "can I make it? Do I have what it takes". (Note, tell them that no matter the answer, you won't be paying for more sessions...coaches here are great but it doesn't hurt to remove bais/partiality)

2) Apply to other companies too. The other MBBs are great as are the Tier 2s/3s. They'll also give you training that may ultimately lead to McK down the road

Hi there,

I have two philosophies (of far too many) that I live by:

1) Future Regret Minimization

2) The greatest accomplishments come from temporary defeat

In terms of #1 What will you regret more in the future? Having tried a 3rd time (and, for the sake of this exercise, failed)? Or, not having tried a 3rd time? Think 2, 3, 4, 5 years down the road. What will you regret?

In terms of #2, I can't tell you how many people I've met who are at their lowest of lowest, failure after failure after failure, who finally "hit it big". If you dream you can achieve.

All this said, may not hurt to do the following:

1) Hire a coach for 1 session. Ask them to tell you, completely and honestly, "can I make it? Do I have what it takes". (Note, tell them that no matter the answer, you won't be paying for more sessions...coaches here are great but it doesn't hurt to remove bais/partiality)

2) Apply to other companies too. The other MBBs are great as are the Tier 2s/3s. They'll also give you training that may ultimately lead to McK down the road

Book a coaching with Ken

100% Recommendation Rate

46 Meetings

4,162 Q&A Upvotes

USD 229 / Coaching

If you are interested in joining McKinsey then absolutely! The fact that you made it to final round before suggests that you met the bar and capable of doing the job. I would prepare very tactically around the areas that let you down last time.

There's a recently elected partner at McKinsey who managed to get an offer on his fourth attempt. He failed for summer BA, BA (ended up working at a tier 2), summer associate and then finally got his offer when he applied during his second year of MBA. His personal advice to candidates was "joining McKinsey is about luck and timing... if it's meant to be, it will work out!".

If you are interested in joining McKinsey then absolutely! The fact that you made it to final round before suggests that you met the bar and capable of doing the job. I would prepare very tactically around the areas that let you down last time.

There's a recently elected partner at McKinsey who managed to get an offer on his fourth attempt. He failed for summer BA, BA (ended up working at a tier 2), summer associate and then finally got his offer when he applied during his second year of MBA. His personal advice to candidates was "joining McKinsey is about luck and timing... if it's meant to be, it will work out!".

Thank you for sharing! That's what I was hoping to hear. I am also working at a Tier-2 so that makes me hopeful. — Anonymous A on Jan 21, 2021

Book a coaching with Adi

100% Recommendation Rate

74 Meetings

6,794 Q&A Upvotes

USD 159 / Coaching

If this what you genuinly want, then yes. Otherwise there is plenty out there and you can be as successfull if not more by taking another route. McK is not the end all..:).

If this what you genuinly want, then yes. Otherwise there is plenty out there and you can be as successfull if not more by taking another route. McK is not the end all..:).

Is it not!? :) — Anonymous B on Jan 21, 2021

Book a coaching with Henning

100% Recommendation Rate

177 Meetings

5,391 Q&A Upvotes

USD 189 / Coaching

Do you want to? If yes, sure! Just make sure to be fully prepared the next time. Your profile is obviously attractive as they keep inviting you, and you have the skills for case prep (as you got to second round), but you should make sure to work with a coach or otherwise experienced interviewer to make sure your performance is consistant.

Do you want to? If yes, sure! Just make sure to be fully prepared the next time. Your profile is obviously attractive as they keep inviting you, and you have the skills for case prep (as you got to second round), but you should make sure to work with a coach or otherwise experienced interviewer to make sure your performance is consistant.

Book a coaching with Gaurav

100% Recommendation Rate

198 Meetings

6,592 Q&A Upvotes

USD 169 / Coaching

Hi there,

short answer: you shouldn't if you don't want it.

Have you been practicing after your 2nd try? The important thing when reapplying is to show an improvement - having studied would also have made you feel more comfortable and prepared for the next try.

If you don't know where to start - hire a professional coach:

  1. It saves your time since it's more efficient than doing it on your own
  2. it'll give you a clear idea where you should arrive and how you'll do it the best way possible
  3. you will get valuable feedback which in that case is crucial

Otherwie, check Preplounge threads on how to reapply. Here are some for you:

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/re-applying-to-mbb-after-round-1-internship-rejection-mba-9011

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/reapplication-8694

Hope it helps! Good luck and don't hesitate to write me if you need any further help.

Cheers,

GB

Hi there,

short answer: you shouldn't if you don't want it.

Have you been practicing after your 2nd try? The important thing when reapplying is to show an improvement - having studied would also have made you feel more comfortable and prepared for the next try.

If you don't know where to start - hire a professional coach:

  1. It saves your time since it's more efficient than doing it on your own
  2. it'll give you a clear idea where you should arrive and how you'll do it the best way possible
  3. you will get valuable feedback which in that case is crucial

Otherwie, check Preplounge threads on how to reapply. Here are some for you:

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/re-applying-to-mbb-after-round-1-internship-rejection-mba-9011

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/reapplication-8694

Hope it helps! Good luck and don't hesitate to write me if you need any further help.

Cheers,

GB

Book a coaching with Clara

100% Recommendation Rate

58 Meetings

15,735 Q&A Upvotes

USD 229 / Coaching

Hello!

I have indeed hear about cases like that.

I would try to see what is the opportunity cost -which is very dicfficult without knowing your circumpstances- and then decide.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

Hello!

I have indeed hear about cases like that.

I would try to see what is the opportunity cost -which is very dicfficult without knowing your circumpstances- and then decide.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

Related case(s)

McKinsey Questions

Solved 39.6k times
McKinsey Questions Tell me of a situation where you had an opinion and no one seemed to agree with you. What was your goal when you decided to join university / work / clubs / a sports team? Did you have a goal that you were not able to reach? What did you do? What do you want to be remembered for and how are you achieving it? What is your typical way of dealing with conflict?
4.5 5 864
| Rating: (4.5 / 5.0) |
Difficulty: Intermediate | Style: Fit Interview | Topics: Personal fit

Tell me of a situation where you had an opinion and no one seemed to agree with you. What was your goal when you decided to join university / work / clubs / a sports team? Did you have a goal that you were not able to reach? What did you do? What do you want to be remembered for and how are you ... Open whole case

MBB Final Round Case - Smart Education

Solved 17.7k times
MBB Final Round Case - Smart Education Our client is SmartBridge, a nonprofit educational institution offering face-to-face tutoring services. The client operates in the US. The mission of SmartBridge is to help as many students as possible to complete studies and prevent that they drop from the school system, in particular in disadvantaged areas. The client is considering starting operations for its services in the Chicago area. They hired us to understand if that makes sense. Due to the nonprofit regulation, SmartBridge should operate on its own in the market, without any partnership. How would you help our client?
4.6 5 628
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

Our client is SmartBridge, a nonprofit educational institution offering face-to-face tutoring services. The client operates in the US. The mission of SmartBridge is to help as many students as possible to complete studies and prevent that they drop from the school system, in particular in disadvant ... Open whole case

Motivational questions – FIT interview preparation

Solved 4.2k times
Motivational questions – FIT interview preparation During this exercise, we will deep-dive in 4 of the most common Motivational questions asked in FIT interviews:   Why Consulting? Why this particular company? (McKinsey, Bain, BCG, others) Why this particular location? *Particularly relevant to people re-locating or choosing an office not in their region Why this particular specialized business function *Only relevant when not applying for a general role (e.g., McKinsey Advanced Analytics, BCG Gamma, etc.) *box-open green* *See Graph 1 – Note: "Motivational" are one of the 4 types of questions you can find in FIT interviews. *box-close* ➥ Graphs from the Integrated FIT Guide for MBB
4.5 5 62
| Rating: (4.5 / 5.0)
Difficulty: Intermediate | Style: Fit Interview | Topics: Personal fit

During this exercise, we will deep-dive in 4 of the most common Motivational questions asked in FIT interviews: Why Consulting? Why this particular company? (McKinsey, Bain, BCG, others) Why this particular location? *Particularly relevant to people re-locating or choosing an office not ... Open whole case

Introduction and CV questions – FIT interview preparation

Solved 3.7k times
Introduction and CV questions – FIT interview preparation During this exercise, we will deep-dive in 3 of the most common Intro & CV questions asked in FIT interviews:  1. Walk me through your CV 2. Tell me about yourself 3. Tell me about the thing that makes you most proud on your CV   *box-open green* *See Graph 1 – Note: "Intro & CV questions" are one of the 4 types of questions you can find in FIT interviews. *box-close* ➥ Graphs from the Integrated FIT Guide for MBB    
4.6 5 59
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)
Difficulty: Intermediate | Style: Fit Interview | Topics: Personal fit

During this exercise, we will deep-dive in 3 of the most common Intro & CV questions asked in FIT interviews: 1. Walk me through your CV 2. Tell me about yourself 3. Tell me about the thing that makes you most proud on your CV *See Graph 1 – Note: "Intro & CV questions" are one of the 4 ty ... Open whole case

Cutting Carbs - Divestiture in the Electrical Power Market

Solved 1.8k times
Cutting Carbs - Divestiture in the Electrical Power Market Our client is Energy England, one of northern England’s largest electric utility companies. They were created over the past decade through an aggressive series of mergers of existing utility companies each specializing in a single energy generation source. Recently, the CEO has embarked on an initiative to return to the core of the business. She is looking to increase free cash flow and cash reserves in order to prepare the business for evolving future trends.   The following can be verbally provided to interviewee if asked: Energy England is made up of assets across the energy-generation space. These include coal, gas, nuclear, and wind We are looking to divest from just one of our previous acquisitions (i.e one target is sufficient) There are no specific goals/metrics – the client trusts our judgement
4.3 5 37
| Rating: (4.3 / 5.0)

Our client is Energy England, one of northern England’s largest electric utility companies. They were created over the past decade through an aggressive series of mergers of existing utility companies each specializing in a single energy generation source. Recently, the CEO has embarked on an initi ... Open whole case