Cookie and Privacy Settings

This website uses cookies to enable essential functions like the user login and sessions. We also use cookies and third-party tools to improve your surfing experience on preplounge.com. You can choose to activate only essential cookies or all cookies. You can always change your preference in the cookie and privacy settings. This link can also be found in the footer of the site. If you need more information, please visit our privacy policy.

Data processing in the USA: By clicking on "I accept", you also consent, in accordance with article 49 paragraph 1 sentence 1 lit. GDPR, to your data being processed in the USA (by Google LLC, Facebook Inc., LinkedIn Inc., Stripe, Paypal).

Manage settings individually I accept
expert
Expert with best answer

Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

90 Meetings

5,292 Q&A Upvotes

USD 239 / Coaching

5

How hard is it to make it to manager at consulting firms? Around what %?

How hard is it to make it to manager at consulting firms? Around what % can make it? (excluding those who leave the firm at will)

What does it take to move from consultant (post-MBA) to manager?

How hard is it to make it to manager at consulting firms? Around what % can make it? (excluding those who leave the firm at will)

What does it take to move from consultant (post-MBA) to manager?

(edited)

5 answers

  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Best Answer
Book a coaching with Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

90 Meetings

5,292 Q&A Upvotes

USD 239 / Coaching

Hi there,

If you come in as a consultant, it will take approximately 2 years. Hard to say exact % because a lot of people simply leave by choice! They only intended to stay a short period of time, or they realize it's not for them. If you truly want it, and you're committed to making it to manager, your odds are actually quite high.

Now, how to get there?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

First: Read the 25 tips in my consulting handbook here: https://www.spencertom.com/2018/01/14/consulting-survival-guide/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second: In terms of things you can learn/do to prepare beforehand:

1) Daily Reading

  • The Economist, The Financial Times, BCG/Mskinsey Insights

2) Industry deep-dives

  • Learn, in-depth, how the industries/companies your office advises, work. (PM me for an industry overview template)

3) Analytics tools

  • Alteryx, Tableau, etc.

4) Excel

5) Powerpoint

  • Best practices/standards
  • Different layouts
  • Quickly editing/updating slides
  • Thinking in PowerPoint

6) Presentation skills / sharp communication

  • There are some online/virtual classes for this

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Third: In terms of doing well in your role when you're there:

1) Understand the context/prompt (what role are you in, what company, who's watching, etc.)

2) Understand the objective (what, specifically, is expected from you...both day to day, and in your overall career progression)

3) Quickly process information, and focus on what's important - Take a lot of information and the unknown, find the most logical path, and focus on that.

4) Be comfortable with the unknown, and learn to brainstorm - think/speak like an expert without being one

In summary, there will always be a flood of information, expectations, competition etc. and not enough time. Find out which ones matter when. (i.e. be visibile and focus efforts on the things that people care about)

Earn Respect: https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/as-a-new-joiner-how-to-earn-seniors-respect-instead-of-being-too-obedient-7006

Navigate Effectively through politics: https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-to-navigate-through-office-politics-as-a-new-joiner-7016

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fourth: Here are some great prior Q&As for you!

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/what-makes-a-good-consultant-how-to-get-a-good-review-6790

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-hard-is-it-to-excel-in-top-consulting-firms-6762

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-to-become-an-engagement-manager-and-partner-quickly-6722

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/need-to-learn-skills-in-the-ample-free-time-before-starting-at-an-mbb-what-should-i-do-6774

Hi there,

If you come in as a consultant, it will take approximately 2 years. Hard to say exact % because a lot of people simply leave by choice! They only intended to stay a short period of time, or they realize it's not for them. If you truly want it, and you're committed to making it to manager, your odds are actually quite high.

Now, how to get there?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

First: Read the 25 tips in my consulting handbook here: https://www.spencertom.com/2018/01/14/consulting-survival-guide/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second: In terms of things you can learn/do to prepare beforehand:

1) Daily Reading

  • The Economist, The Financial Times, BCG/Mskinsey Insights

2) Industry deep-dives

  • Learn, in-depth, how the industries/companies your office advises, work. (PM me for an industry overview template)

3) Analytics tools

  • Alteryx, Tableau, etc.

4) Excel

5) Powerpoint

  • Best practices/standards
  • Different layouts
  • Quickly editing/updating slides
  • Thinking in PowerPoint

6) Presentation skills / sharp communication

  • There are some online/virtual classes for this

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Third: In terms of doing well in your role when you're there:

1) Understand the context/prompt (what role are you in, what company, who's watching, etc.)

2) Understand the objective (what, specifically, is expected from you...both day to day, and in your overall career progression)

3) Quickly process information, and focus on what's important - Take a lot of information and the unknown, find the most logical path, and focus on that.

4) Be comfortable with the unknown, and learn to brainstorm - think/speak like an expert without being one

In summary, there will always be a flood of information, expectations, competition etc. and not enough time. Find out which ones matter when. (i.e. be visibile and focus efforts on the things that people care about)

Earn Respect: https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/as-a-new-joiner-how-to-earn-seniors-respect-instead-of-being-too-obedient-7006

Navigate Effectively through politics: https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-to-navigate-through-office-politics-as-a-new-joiner-7016

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fourth: Here are some great prior Q&As for you!

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/what-makes-a-good-consultant-how-to-get-a-good-review-6790

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-hard-is-it-to-excel-in-top-consulting-firms-6762

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/how-to-become-an-engagement-manager-and-partner-quickly-6722

https://www.preplounge.com/en/consulting-forum/need-to-learn-skills-in-the-ample-free-time-before-starting-at-an-mbb-what-should-i-do-6774

Book a coaching with Henning

100% Recommendation Rate

22 Meetings

365 Q&A Upvotes

USD 149 / Coaching

Hi Anonymous!

It is not as easy to asnwer, because:

  1. You can't exclude those who leave the firm at will, because often they go hand-in-hand
  2. It varies by firm and office

Across the industry, the average career at a consulting firm is 2-3 years. As this is roughly the time between post-MBA hiring and Manager promotion and assuming a long tail for people that stay in consulting as a long-term career, this leaves you with a number of 25-40%. This does not say anything about the quality of people that leave before becoming Manager or their suitability to this job or another. It's purely the descriptive statistic.

Hi Anonymous!

It is not as easy to asnwer, because:

  1. You can't exclude those who leave the firm at will, because often they go hand-in-hand
  2. It varies by firm and office

Across the industry, the average career at a consulting firm is 2-3 years. As this is roughly the time between post-MBA hiring and Manager promotion and assuming a long tail for people that stay in consulting as a long-term career, this leaves you with a number of 25-40%. This does not say anything about the quality of people that leave before becoming Manager or their suitability to this job or another. It's purely the descriptive statistic.

Book a coaching with Andre

100% Recommendation Rate

87 Meetings

3,937 Q&A Upvotes

USD 239 / Coaching

Dear A,

If that's your goal, than you can make it. I wouldn't insist that it's not possible or will take you a lot of time. You just need to know the system and how to succeed in it.

I have a program about long term career success, where I share tips and tricks o how to get fast promotion.

If you are interested about, feel free to drop me a line.

best,

André

Dear A,

If that's your goal, than you can make it. I wouldn't insist that it's not possible or will take you a lot of time. You just need to know the system and how to succeed in it.

I have a program about long term career success, where I share tips and tricks o how to get fast promotion.

If you are interested about, feel free to drop me a line.

best,

André

Book a coaching with Robert

96% Recommendation Rate

305 Meetings

2,048 Q&A Upvotes

USD 219 / Coaching

Hi Anonymous,

Moving to manager level (assuming you refer to project manager) is actually not that difficult but more like a natural progression of managing the whole team and workstreams. I don't have hard numbers on that for McKinsey, but I'd estimate something around 20-25% (don't forget to consider natural churn of people, so just looking at the percentage number without the consulting pyramid context might be strongly misleading!).

What is actually much more difficult is the progression to partner level. Not only do you need to bring in a substantial amount of revenue and contribute generally a lot to the firm and practice, but also it's a highly political game which you need to know how to play. Without strong support network inside the firm you won't get there, based solely on your 'objective' metrics.

Hope that helps - if so, please be so kind to give it a thumbs-up with the green upvote button below!

Robert

Hi Anonymous,

Moving to manager level (assuming you refer to project manager) is actually not that difficult but more like a natural progression of managing the whole team and workstreams. I don't have hard numbers on that for McKinsey, but I'd estimate something around 20-25% (don't forget to consider natural churn of people, so just looking at the percentage number without the consulting pyramid context might be strongly misleading!).

What is actually much more difficult is the progression to partner level. Not only do you need to bring in a substantial amount of revenue and contribute generally a lot to the firm and practice, but also it's a highly political game which you need to know how to play. Without strong support network inside the firm you won't get there, based solely on your 'objective' metrics.

Hope that helps - if so, please be so kind to give it a thumbs-up with the green upvote button below!

Robert

Book a coaching with Vlad

97% Recommendation Rate

389 Meetings

7,933 Q&A Upvotes

USD 239 / Coaching

Hi,

The hoardest transitions are:

  • BA >> Associate
  • Associate Partner >> Partner

The transition to the manager is relatively easy since you start managing teams earlier, when you are an Associate. You get the title once everyone is sure you can do that. Post MBA it's even more straight forward since you are quite mature at this point

Best

Hi,

The hoardest transitions are:

  • BA >> Associate
  • Associate Partner >> Partner

The transition to the manager is relatively easy since you start managing teams earlier, when you are an Associate. You get the title once everyone is sure you can do that. Post MBA it's even more straight forward since you are quite mature at this point

Best