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Difference between a structure and a framework

Laura

Hello,

I am still not completely sure about the difference between a structure and a framework. So, if I understood it correctly, a structure is a customised approach or "guideline" which you set up by yourself in the beginning in order to solve your case systematically whereas a framework is an already existing concept which can assist you in solving the case. Is that correct?

Thank you for your efforts in advance!

(edited)

Peter
Expert
replied on 01/21/2017
Ex-Bain & Company Case Team Leader * Placed 40+ MBB candidates as Partner in Europe's leading top-tier Consulting recruiting firm

They're often used interchangeably in the real world, but they tend to have more specific meanings when it comes to case studies:

  • A structure is the logic and approach by which you crack your problem. As every problem is different in its own way, you'll want a structure which fits. For example, imagine the question is whether Company A should acquire Company B. You might want to look at 4 things (company A strategy, company B market, company B market position and strengths and price). What you don't want to do is just start talking without thinking or knowing where you're going: "Well, company B seems good I guess but it would take time and it's products seem good but..."
  • As you mentioned, a framework is generally understood to be a series of steps or topics which you address in order to solve a problem, generally created in academia or business. You never want to use one of these in a case. Recruiters are looking for critical thought and using a "one size fits all" way of breaking down a problem that you read in a book does not help demonstrate it.

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