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Comment on final math number for McK cases

case math
New answer on Feb 29, 2024
4 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Jul 16, 2021

I've noticed for McK sometimes the math question isn't directly related to the goal of the client..so how could you comment on the final math answer then? For eg, if we are trying to improve quality of a restaurant service and suddenly we are calculating the additional revenue from introducing more pies on the menu..how would I comment on the additional revenue number (I could say we need to ensure the additional pies are great given our goal is better quality..but what else?) are there general levers you should always comment on when it comes to math..like how realistic this number is to achieve etc..? This seems easier to do in candidate-driven cases where there is a natural flow from one analysis to the other

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Florian
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updated an answer on Aug 17, 2021
1300 5-star reviews across platforms | 500+ offers | Highest-rated case book on Amazon | Uni lecturer in US, Asia, EU

Hey there,

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UPDATE

I have written a detailed insider perspective on the McKinsey case interview here: https://www.preplounge.com/en/mckinsey-interview

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Your observations are correct. In McKinsey cases, every question is almost like a mini-case in itself.

To answer your question more directly, you can still create powerful implications that are relevant for the case prompt once you have calculated your revenue number.

A potential discussion that is relevant to the case prompt could be something along the lines like this:

  • New dishes would generate USD x more revenue, which would obviously benefit our client
  • However, keeping our core goal in mind here, the more dishes we offer, the higher the complexity for the kitchen, which could lead to new issues, and the higher the need for additional produce, which might not be fresh anymore
  • My hypothesis is that this could negatively impact the quality of the food and the service and decrease the dining experience for our client's guests
  • As concrete next steps I would like to look into 2 things, 1. Understand how many more dishes we could offer without compromising on the quality and 2. Find other ways to increase revenue with our existing menu

Hope this is helpful! :-)

Cheers,

Florian

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Ian
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replied on Jul 17, 2021
#1 BCG coach | MBB | Tier 2 | Digital, Tech, Platinion | 100% personal success rate (8/8) | 95% candidate success rate

Hi there,

Florian gave and excellent answer with great examples - I can't beat that!

Just remember, to the extent possible, you are always trying to tie it back to the broader question/objective at hand. You are always assessing whether it makes sense and is reasonable.

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Florian on Jul 23, 2021

Thanks Ian! :-)

Perry replied on Feb 29, 2024

In my opinion, this may have a detrimental effect on the service and food quality, which would in turn make our client's clients' dining experience less satisfactory.

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dejawitting replied on Nov 22, 2023

It appears to be less of a challenge to accomplish this in candidate-driven scenarios when the transitions between analyses are seamless. 

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Florian gave the best answer

Florian

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