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Ian

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2

Capacity vs. Output?

I know very little about the power generation industry, which is perhaps why I'm confused, but I have a question about the capacity and output math.

Once you calculate running hours I would expect you would need to know the output per hour. Then total output/capacity would be running hours * output per hour. Then I'd expect to compare the total annual output capacity to Mr. Friday's needs (5 KWh) to see if either method (offshore/onshore) meets his power needs. For example, if this were a case about widgets, I'd calculate Ms. Robinson's capacity by multiplying the number of widgets per hour she could manufacture * the number of hours she worked per year. Then I'd compare that capacity against Mr. Friday's widget needs.

Is there something about power generation I don't understand?

Thanks!

I know very little about the power generation industry, which is perhaps why I'm confused, but I have a question about the capacity and output math.

Once you calculate running hours I would expect you would need to know the output per hour. Then total output/capacity would be running hours * output per hour. Then I'd expect to compare the total annual output capacity to Mr. Friday's needs (5 KWh) to see if either method (offshore/onshore) meets his power needs. For example, if this were a case about widgets, I'd calculate Ms. Robinson's capacity by multiplying the number of widgets per hour she could manufacture * the number of hours she worked per year. Then I'd compare that capacity against Mr. Friday's widget needs.

Is there something about power generation I don't understand?

Thanks!

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Book a coaching with Ian

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Hi Jackson,

If you can be patient for a couple of days I've actually just created a new case for electrical utilities/power companies that should help you with this :)

That said, yes, utility assets are measured by Mwh/Gwh (megawatt hours and gigawatt hours). This is how much they produce per hour (at peak output). Multiplying this by hours per day and days per year will get you the annual demand that needs to be met!

Edit: I have just published a new case on the electricity generation market. Take a look here! https://www.preplounge.com/en/management-consulting-cases/candidate-led-usual-style/intermediate/cutting-carbs-divestiture-in-the-electrical-power-market-228

Hi Jackson,

If you can be patient for a couple of days I've actually just created a new case for electrical utilities/power companies that should help you with this :)

That said, yes, utility assets are measured by Mwh/Gwh (megawatt hours and gigawatt hours). This is how much they produce per hour (at peak output). Multiplying this by hours per day and days per year will get you the annual demand that needs to be met!

Edit: I have just published a new case on the electricity generation market. Take a look here! https://www.preplounge.com/en/management-consulting-cases/candidate-led-usual-style/intermediate/cutting-carbs-divestiture-in-the-electrical-power-market-228

(edited)

Dear Ian, I took a look into the case, and at the end I quite don't understand the calculation of the NPV of Operating Costs ($2.695B / 10%), could you guide me better where this comes from? Thanks — Luis Pe├▒aloza on Feb 01, 2021

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Hello!

In general, capacity refers to the total output you can generate in an ideal scenario. Output, however, is what you indeed generate.

Hence, capacity >= actual output

Best regards,

Clara

Hello!

In general, capacity refers to the total output you can generate in an ideal scenario. Output, however, is what you indeed generate.

Hence, capacity >= actual output

Best regards,

Clara