After coffee chat, how to ask people to introduce other connections to you?

networking
New answer on Jun 05, 2020
7 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Jun 03, 2020

Many people mentioned that during networking and coffee chats, it is important to ask the person to introduce another connection to you. I've done coffee chats many times, but I always find it really awkward to ask the person who I've spoken to for the first time to "introduce someone to me", even if the conversation went through well. Could anyone share some tips? What would be a good, polite, and natural way to ask them to do this favour? Thanks!

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Daniel
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 03, 2020
McKinsey / ex-Interviewer at McKinsey / I will coach you to rock those interviews

Usually, your genuine interest and honesty do the job.

Example: you are talking to somebody from McKinsey and you want to get a job at McKinsey. You are also interested in digital and curious what McKinsey Digital has to offer. You can say something like this: “Hey, this was a great conversation, I come from a digital background and I’m interested in job opportunities at McKinsey, is there any chance you can connect me with somebody from McKinsey Digital, so that they share their perspective on the job and I can ask a few questions?”

That’s it, just be honest about your goal. In my experience as long as you have a clear goal in mind majority of people will be happy to connect with you and to help you out. But of course connecting for the sake of connecting does not make sense. That is why if you just want to connect to please your Linkedin vanity – people will spot it and will react allergically.

best,
Daniel

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Vlad
Expert
updated an answer on Jun 04, 2020
McKinsey / Accenture Alum / Got all BIG3 offers / Harvard Business School

Hi,

Just be honest and ask them if they could introduce you to any other consultants for another practice round. There is nothing wrong here.

However, why do you need that many connections from the same company? It's good to check yourself every 10-15 cases and do a case with a real consultant. But I would not spend too much time and effort networking just for a single case. I think you are making your life harder overcomplicating the process

Best

(edited)

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Anonymous replied on Jun 03, 2020

Hi there,

A nice technique would be to ask the person you are speaking if there is anyone from his team currently working in industry X/Y/Z because you read about the impact of "XX" on "YY" and it would be great to get a consultant's view on this topic as well.

Example: "Is there anyone working from your team here working on mobility? It would be great to get his/her views on the impact of Covid on the future of mobility solutions" (and make sure that you have read this article beforehand so you have something interesting to say https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/automotive-and-assembly/our-insights/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-future-mobility-solutions)

By directing the conversation to a specific industry, it makes the transition to a "new expert" much easier.

I hope it helps.

Khaled

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Clara
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 03, 2020
McKinsey | Awarded professor at Master in Management @ IE | MBA at MIT |+180 students coached | Integrated FIT Guide aut

Hello!

I agree with Daniel here, honestly. I don´t think there is a need to over-complicate.

Consultants who go to a coffee chat perfectly know why you are there, so what is the point in pretending? In my case, for instance, when I was in those situations, I actually appreciated honestly and to-the-point people.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

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Anonymous replied on Jun 05, 2020

Hello,

From the moment you make this request finely without suggesting that the discussion with this person was not satisfactory, then I don't see any problem.

You just have to be diplomatic :)

David

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Anonymous replied on Jun 05, 2020

Dear A,

I would follow on what experts say, because it's really true. Just be honest, clear and straight.

Also, to minimize your anxiety about this specific chance, just don't put all your life there, but remeber that honesty will make it deal, if you really need it.

Best,

André

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Ian
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 04, 2020
#1 BCG coach | MBB | Tier 2 | Digital, Tech, Platinion | 100% personal success rate (8/8) | 95% candidate success rate

Hi there,

I understand this - it can feel awkward/needy. However, welcome to the real world!

Take this as an opportunity to practice for the real-world - you'll need this skill during your career as well!

I highly recommend any of the following:

1) Leverage something you've specifically spoken about during the conversation

2) If they've mentioned anyone's name during the conversation, bring that person up at the end and ask if they might be interested in speaking

3) Leverage your interest in x to get a contact in x. This can be office/country, function practice, industry practice, expertise/interest, similar background (career, life journey, place in society etc.). Say, "As you know, I'm very interested in x. Do you happen to know anyone at the firm that I could speak to further about how they've seen this at the company?"

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Daniel gave the best answer

Daniel

Content Creator
McKinsey / ex-Interviewer at McKinsey / I will coach you to rock those interviews
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