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Clara

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McKinsey: expert hire vs. experienced hire

McKinsey has opened an "expert" consultant role in the industry that I'm working, while at the same time having a generalist role (experienced hire; associate) opened. I'm wondering whether it's recommended to apply both? I prefer being a generalist but at the same time was thinking maybe expert role would be slightly easier to get an offer.

If I get the offer of "expert" role, does it mean that I will have to stick to this specific industry without being able to participate in projects of other industries? Thanks a lot!

McKinsey has opened an "expert" consultant role in the industry that I'm working, while at the same time having a generalist role (experienced hire; associate) opened. I'm wondering whether it's recommended to apply both? I prefer being a generalist but at the same time was thinking maybe expert role would be slightly easier to get an offer.

If I get the offer of "expert" role, does it mean that I will have to stick to this specific industry without being able to participate in projects of other industries? Thanks a lot!

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Book a coaching with Clara

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Hello! Here are my toughts:

  • Regarding the definition of the Expert Track: it means that you will mainly be working on topics and clients related to the industry. The job description and scope are the same ones than a generalist role, the only thing that changes is the topic -and it influences the lifestyle, probably better schedules but more traveling-.
  • Regarding how accesible they may be: if you have good industry knowledge, I would go for the Expert role, since the pool of applicants tends to be lower and hence, less competence.

Good luck!

Cheers,

Clara

Hello! Here are my toughts:

  • Regarding the definition of the Expert Track: it means that you will mainly be working on topics and clients related to the industry. The job description and scope are the same ones than a generalist role, the only thing that changes is the topic -and it influences the lifestyle, probably better schedules but more traveling-.
  • Regarding how accesible they may be: if you have good industry knowledge, I would go for the Expert role, since the pool of applicants tends to be lower and hence, less competence.

Good luck!

Cheers,

Clara

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Hi!

An expert role is tied to its specific topic. So if you are hired as an industry expert, you will practically always work in this industry. There might be specific exceptions, if for example a client from another industry wants to learn about a certain best practice from your industry (this happens sometimes). But as I said - 99% of the time you will be tied to your industry as an industry expert.

Cheers, Sidi

Hi!

An expert role is tied to its specific topic. So if you are hired as an industry expert, you will practically always work in this industry. There might be specific exceptions, if for example a client from another industry wants to learn about a certain best practice from your industry (this happens sometimes). But as I said - 99% of the time you will be tied to your industry as an industry expert.

Cheers, Sidi

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I confirm the expert roles are less competitive, but then it is hard to move to generalist path or to other practices

I confirm the expert roles are less competitive, but then it is hard to move to generalist path or to other practices

Book a coaching with Luca

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Hello,

If you apply for the "expert role" you will be tied to that specific practice.
It will be really difficult to change fild of projects, especially if you don't have any consulting expercience as generalist. Considering this, also your career progression will be directly influenced by that specific practice's performance.

Best,
Luca

Hello,

If you apply for the "expert role" you will be tied to that specific practice.
It will be really difficult to change fild of projects, especially if you don't have any consulting expercience as generalist. Considering this, also your career progression will be directly influenced by that specific practice's performance.

Best,
Luca

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Hi,

Several points here:

  • If you have deep expertise in the field getting an expert role will be easier
  • One downside is that you'll be always tied to a certain industry / function
  • Another downside is that although McKinsey created an expert track to partner several years ago, I believe it's still much harder / longer to grow as an expert

Best

Hi,

Several points here:

  • If you have deep expertise in the field getting an expert role will be easier
  • One downside is that you'll be always tied to a certain industry / function
  • Another downside is that although McKinsey created an expert track to partner several years ago, I believe it's still much harder / longer to grow as an expert

Best

Thanks Vlad. Is it possible for an expert track person to switch gears to other industry? — Anonymous A on Feb 09, 2020