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Guennael

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7

McK Final Round feedback

I had my final round interview at McK recently in a smaller US office and same day I got a feedback where the interviewer started with that they do not have space for me this year. He used exact wording and did not proceed with feedback directly. This surprised me but then I requested for feedback.

The feedback was mostly positive than negative. They loved my fit, quant, structure. One improvement area was creativity. The interviewer mentioned that they would love me there and not to the competition and encouraged to apply again next year.

The feedback surprised me overall. Is it typical or am I reading too much? I guess nothing can change now but just wanted to understand what may be the case.

I had my final round interview at McK recently in a smaller US office and same day I got a feedback where the interviewer started with that they do not have space for me this year. He used exact wording and did not proceed with feedback directly. This surprised me but then I requested for feedback.

The feedback was mostly positive than negative. They loved my fit, quant, structure. One improvement area was creativity. The interviewer mentioned that they would love me there and not to the competition and encouraged to apply again next year.

The feedback surprised me overall. Is it typical or am I reading too much? I guess nothing can change now but just wanted to understand what may be the case.

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Book a coaching with Guennael

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Sorry about the rejection. You should always ask for feedback, with the understanding that it often will not be very useful. Sometimes, like in my case the first time I applied, the feedback even seemed geared towards another applicant (I was told I needed to do more extra-curricular / non-profit work, when this was exactly what set me apart from most of my classmates). Only sometimes will the feedback be useful, actionable and relevant.

Why is that? Well, ask yourself: the interviewer already took a pass on you, and has many other things to work on. What is his incentive to really spend time to help you? That's right, slim to nil.

Beyond this, also remember there are very few openings each year, and many more qualified candidates. This means MBB (and most consultancies really) will often have to reject outstanding people, some who may even have done everything right in the interviews. We all know that Harvard and Stanford reject outstanding candidates (acceptance becomes nearly random at some point), yet selectivity at MBB is much higher still.

Keep your chin up, McK rejecting your application doesn't say anything about you. Even better, he suggested you reapply next year - not everyone gets this feedback. Keep practicing (remain sharp), hopefully next year you'll have a better outcome.

Sorry about the rejection. You should always ask for feedback, with the understanding that it often will not be very useful. Sometimes, like in my case the first time I applied, the feedback even seemed geared towards another applicant (I was told I needed to do more extra-curricular / non-profit work, when this was exactly what set me apart from most of my classmates). Only sometimes will the feedback be useful, actionable and relevant.

Why is that? Well, ask yourself: the interviewer already took a pass on you, and has many other things to work on. What is his incentive to really spend time to help you? That's right, slim to nil.

Beyond this, also remember there are very few openings each year, and many more qualified candidates. This means MBB (and most consultancies really) will often have to reject outstanding people, some who may even have done everything right in the interviews. We all know that Harvard and Stanford reject outstanding candidates (acceptance becomes nearly random at some point), yet selectivity at MBB is much higher still.

Keep your chin up, McK rejecting your application doesn't say anything about you. Even better, he suggested you reapply next year - not everyone gets this feedback. Keep practicing (remain sharp), hopefully next year you'll have a better outcome.

Book a coaching with Gaurav

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Hi there!
Sorry to hear about that! However, rejection is also an experience. Use the time given to significantly upgrade your profile and to maximize your chances next year!

- Relevant work experience. Have you applied somewhere else? Tier 2 consulting firms could be a great start and give you the needed experience that would be of great advantage in the future and make you a better fit for the desired company.

- Preparation. Solve different types of cases, prepare for the fit part carefully, improve your feeling of confidence.

- Networking. I would strongly recommend finding some contacts within the targeted firm to understand how it is from the inside, have a better idea of your position here in the future.

Maybe even think of the guidance of an experienced coach.

Do you need any further help?
Good luck!

​GB

Hi there!
Sorry to hear about that! However, rejection is also an experience. Use the time given to significantly upgrade your profile and to maximize your chances next year!

- Relevant work experience. Have you applied somewhere else? Tier 2 consulting firms could be a great start and give you the needed experience that would be of great advantage in the future and make you a better fit for the desired company.

- Preparation. Solve different types of cases, prepare for the fit part carefully, improve your feeling of confidence.

- Networking. I would strongly recommend finding some contacts within the targeted firm to understand how it is from the inside, have a better idea of your position here in the future.

Maybe even think of the guidance of an experienced coach.

Do you need any further help?
Good luck!

​GB

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Sorry to hear. Feedback typically contains a lot of positives, but it is also honest. So I would take it at face value and think about how to improve. It sounds a bit like you could build your business judgement (or intuition). A general understanding of what drives businesses across sectors and the ability to transfer this to new sectors taht you have not worked with.

Typically making these connections, especially if they are far, is not required to pass to the next round or get an offer, but they give you extra points and might balance out issues in other areas (e.g. the quant part.)

To build this level of deep understanding, you can read business newspapers and case studies conscously. Make it a habit to read the business sections of FT or Economist and reflect on the underlying issues. Read case studies on interesting dynamics of random industries to gradually build an understanding of what typical drivers are. Things like:

  • What are typical customer segments and which are more attractive for the business to please?
  • Is the industry driven by fixed or variable costs and how does this influence decision making?
  • What are typical power structures along the value chain (e.g. monopoly in raw materials) and how does this effect the relationship between players?
  • Is the business dependent on/subject to strong government regulation or do they long for a free, unregulated market?

There are many more of these questions that help you build this intuition and eventually can provide interesting insights into a case, even if not explicitly mentioned by the interviewer.

Sorry to hear. Feedback typically contains a lot of positives, but it is also honest. So I would take it at face value and think about how to improve. It sounds a bit like you could build your business judgement (or intuition). A general understanding of what drives businesses across sectors and the ability to transfer this to new sectors taht you have not worked with.

Typically making these connections, especially if they are far, is not required to pass to the next round or get an offer, but they give you extra points and might balance out issues in other areas (e.g. the quant part.)

To build this level of deep understanding, you can read business newspapers and case studies conscously. Make it a habit to read the business sections of FT or Economist and reflect on the underlying issues. Read case studies on interesting dynamics of random industries to gradually build an understanding of what typical drivers are. Things like:

  • What are typical customer segments and which are more attractive for the business to please?
  • Is the industry driven by fixed or variable costs and how does this influence decision making?
  • What are typical power structures along the value chain (e.g. monopoly in raw materials) and how does this effect the relationship between players?
  • Is the business dependent on/subject to strong government regulation or do they long for a free, unregulated market?

There are many more of these questions that help you build this intuition and eventually can provide interesting insights into a case, even if not explicitly mentioned by the interviewer.

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Sorry to hear about that :(

In this cases, it´s

Sorry to hear about that :(

In this cases, it´s

Dear A,

It is always a good thing to ask for a feedback. It is true that the competition is sufficiently strong and you don't always get a chance to make it straight up to the final round and getting a job.

But asking for a feedback may also help in future when applying for new jobs. It also shows you're interested in the results and might do everything better next time. Besides, sometimes constructive feedback can really point out your weaknesses that you might get rid of by the next time.

Getting postive feedback you can also understand your strong points to make them even more significant.

Best,

Andre

Dear A,

It is always a good thing to ask for a feedback. It is true that the competition is sufficiently strong and you don't always get a chance to make it straight up to the final round and getting a job.

But asking for a feedback may also help in future when applying for new jobs. It also shows you're interested in the results and might do everything better next time. Besides, sometimes constructive feedback can really point out your weaknesses that you might get rid of by the next time.

Getting postive feedback you can also understand your strong points to make them even more significant.

Best,

Andre

Makes sense now. Thanks for the responses.

Makes sense now. Thanks for the responses.

It's less common to get a feedback in the final round. I had final round interviews twice and didn't get feedback at any of them (didn't pass first time, passed 2nd time, still no feedback).

Finally, it sounds like you didn't pass their expectations on brainstroming. Just because 80% of the feedback was positive, doesn't mean the remaining 20% are a minor thing. That's how they communiate the feedback. You had quite a typical feedback, not sure why it surprised you, let me translate it for you: we liked your fit and math but your brainstroming, which is 1/3 of the case wasn't strong enough. It would help to work on business judgement if you plan to re-apply. Good luck!

It's less common to get a feedback in the final round. I had final round interviews twice and didn't get feedback at any of them (didn't pass first time, passed 2nd time, still no feedback).

Finally, it sounds like you didn't pass their expectations on brainstroming. Just because 80% of the feedback was positive, doesn't mean the remaining 20% are a minor thing. That's how they communiate the feedback. You had quite a typical feedback, not sure why it surprised you, let me translate it for you: we liked your fit and math but your brainstroming, which is 1/3 of the case wasn't strong enough. It would help to work on business judgement if you plan to re-apply. Good luck!

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