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LEK Applied numerical reasoning test

Anonymous A

Hi Everyone,

I have been invited by L.E.K. to take an online numerical reasoning test called Applied. I can't find information about this test and I am not sure how to prepare. Does anyone have experience with this test?

In the invite email it is stated that:

"The numerical reasoning test is designed to represent the type of quantitative work that we do and as such will give us an indication as to whether you are able to meet the numerical requirements of the role. Whilst the level of maths required is no higher than GCSE, the questions are designed to make you think. Whilst you should try and complete all of the questions, please do not worry if you do not complete the full test in the time given. Once you begin the test, you must complete it in one session."

By logging in, I also found out that the test contains 18 multiple-choice questions, and the time limit is 30 minutes.

My main question is whether this test is similar to McKinsey PST or it's more like a GMAT type test?

Thanks in advance,

Zoltan

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Vlad replied on 10/31/2017
McKinsey / Accenture / More than 300 real MBB cases / Collected all Big 3 offers / Harvard Business School

Hi,

Here are some tips how to prep:

1) Fast math - train, train, and train again

  • Learn how to multiply double digit numbers (google fast math tips)
  • Learn the division table up to 1/11 (i.e. 5/6 = 83.3)
  • Learn how to work with zeros (Hint: 4000000 = 4*10ˆ6)
  • Use math tools (Mimir math for iOS), Math tool on Viktor Cheng website to practice
  • Use GMAT math part

2) Critical Reasoning

  • GMAT test CR and IR parts (Official guide and Manhattan prep)
  • Mckinsey practice tests
  • PST like tests from the web

3) Working with tables and graphs and deriving conclusions

  • Study "Say it with Charts" book
  • Check all available MBB presentations and publications. Practice to derive conclusions and check yourself with the actual ones from the article/presentation
  • GMAT IR part (Official guide and Manhattan prep)
  • Learn basic statistics (Any GMAT or MBA prep guides)

Good luck!

Costas replied on 10/31/2017

Hi,

I've had this test twice (for separate applications). It's more a GMAT-like format test, not McKinsey/BCG style test. Even though there were some pretty simple questions, I'd say that the level of difficulty increases significantly after the 14-16th question (or at least that was my impression for both tests). You may think that 30 minutes is enough for 18 questions, but honestly you'll need all 30 minutes to answer them and you may still be in a rush to solve the last (and more difficult) questions. The good thing though is that you're allowed to go back, so you can change your answer if you want. Prepare yourself as you would do for any GMAT-like numerical test.

Good luck!

Livia Maria replied on 10/29/2017

Hello, I completed this test in the Munich Office at the end of september, it is more a GMAT test than a MCK/BCG online test. Math questions (e.g. two fractions and you have to state which one is higher) and logical/reasoning questions. cheers and good luck

(edited)

Francesco replied on 11/02/2017
Ex BCG | MBB Specialist | #1 Expert for meetings done (1000+) and recommendation rate (100%)

Hi Zoltan,

I agree with Livia and Costas, the test is more similar to GRE/GMAT quant sections – you won’t need graph analysis or PST style practice. Some suggestions to go faster with the math:

  • Divide complex math in smaller logical steps: if you have to compute 96*39, you can divide it in 96*40 - 96*1 = 100*40 - 4*40 - 96*1 = 4000 – 160 – 100 + 4 = 3744
  • Use shortcuts: the most useful to know are:
    • Fractions, at least 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/9
    • Cubes, ideally till 19^2
  • Practice: GMAT and GRE books (quant part) would be enough for the preparation

Best,

Francesco