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Is it worth it or should I move on?

Big 4 Deloitte EY KPMG PwC
New answer on Jun 17, 2024
5 Answers
178 Views
Anonymous A asked on Jun 11, 2024

I'm seeking advice on how to address a difficult situation I recently faced in a project. I recently joined a new project team based on a manager's recommendation, but the manager had hired an expert consultant they were learning alongside, leading to conflicts and an uncomfortable dynamic. As the analyst, I worked hard to support the team and align perspectives, but the manager's use of a waterfall methodology instead of agile led to daily crises and last-minute work.

After just 3 months of a planned 1-year project, the manager surprisingly asked me to leave, citing the need for me to get more exposure in other projects and this is for the best of the team, though I believe this was unfair. Soon after my departure, the consultant also left the project, and the manager brought on replacements and they might be struggling due to their micromanagement, ungrateful, demanding way of management. 

I have a stong promotion case and I already spoke to the partner (lead) and HR for my promotion case, but I kind of understood it was approved and my only thinking is the biased manager's feedback. It was not stated officially, but I understood it verbally, and I'm extremely disappointed they seem to think of me this way. I suspect they may have been making excuses for financial reasons, as others who joined after me and delivered less work have been promoted. Unfortunately, this experience has now resulted in negative feedback about my readiness for advancement, despite my other 10 positive supportive reviews, which I believe is biased and unfair.

I'm considering reaching out again to HR, my partner, and my coach again to provide my perspective and evidence of my strong work, but I'm not sure if that's the best path, or if I should instead focus on finding a new opportunity elsewhere. What do you think is the best way for me to address this situation? Should I continue fighting the negative feedback, or move on? I feel undervalued, unappreciated, and a bit hurt, have lost trust, and really want to leave

(edited)

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Anonymous B updated the answer on Jun 12, 2024

Hi there,

I have been in your exact shoes so will share my two cents. I have experienced a similar situation where your best effort is not perceived as the best for the team. You get stuck in a loop trying to do too much to align with your team's objectives, too much to impress only to have to rework all of that last minute. Most importantly, you feel undervalued and I commend you for not feeling at fault and still holding your worth high. That's the spirit to see with which to see these things - you are super talented but you need to position yourself among people who value that talent. 

In my case, I reflected on the projects I had enjoyed the most during my time in consulting, and the answer was investment strategy. Find the network of clients/colleagues/experts you met on the projects you enjoyed the most, approach them to help you find your true calling. As for me, I found my way out of consulting into an investment firm and that has made all the difference! :)

Realize you got immense potential and talent, it's only a matter of putting yourself in a position that allows your potential to shine and have a real impact!

All the best, I hope you too find your true calling whether it is to stay in consulting or pivot. There's nothing wrong with either, do what you want to do and not the world preaches!

(edited)

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Florian
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 12, 2024
1300 5-star reviews across platforms | 500+ offers | Highest-rated case book on Amazon | Uni lecturer in US, Asia, EU

Hi there,

I think Anon B wrote a great answer that shows deep reflection.

You might still be in the rage stage, where it feels unfair and you can't think of anything else.

The reality is: It's not a great situation. I can understand your frustration. But on the other hand its also not the end of the world and these things happen daily to millions of other people on the job.

If your knee-jerk reaction is to “wanting to leave” at the first experience of adversity in this job, it might make sense to also work on your own processing and resilience with regards to these situations. 

It certainly won't be the last time you feel this way and worse things might happen in your corporate career in the future.

You need to find a way to turn this into some positive or at least neutral, and for that matter, Anon B wrote a great answer!

If you feel like it, make one final attempt to rectify the situation with the people and departments you mentioned, keeping in mind that they likely have also heard a different perspective from the manager and already considered the case.

All the best,

Florian

 

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Cristian
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 12, 2024
#1 rated MBB & McKinsey Coach

I'm really sorry to hear this. 

I've been in similar situations and I know how painful it can feel. Really really sorry to hear. 

Basically, what I'd do, is that I would speak with my evaluator / basically the person who presents your case in the promotion committee, and position the discussion as a joint problem-solving where he is meant to advise you on how to deal with the feedback that you received from this manager, with you basically indirectly communicating why you felt it was unfair with factual examples (in general, in these situations, point to examples, don't provide your interpretation of them). 

That's about as much as you can do in this context. 

Best,
Cristian

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Pedro
Expert
replied on Jun 17, 2024
Bain | EY-Parthenon | Private Equity | Market Estimates | Fit Interview

You should:

  1. Discuss this with your coach / mentor at the firm
  2. Evaluate if (some of) the other 10 evaluations you have are from people who really enjoyed working with you and support you.

In your career you'll meet people you enjoy working with and they enjoy working with you and support you; and people with whom you don't get along professionally that well. That is normal. You should focus on working with the people that truly enjoy you - if you have people like that in the firm, and have the chance to work with them again on a frequent basis, you should stay. If that's not the case, you have to either 1) reflect on your own performance and behavior (is this career really a good fit for you); 2) find a different firm.

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Hagen
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Jun 13, 2024
#1 recommended coach | >95% success rate | most experience in consulting, interviewing, and coaching

Hi there,

First of all, I am sorry to hear about your negative experience with your manager!

I would be happy to share my thoughts on your situation:

  • First of all, I would advise you to document all interactions and feedback related to the project and your performance reviews. This can help provide a clear basis for any discussions with the person presenting your promotion case.
  • Moreover, I think it is great to continue the conversation with your coach and the person presenting your promotion case and provide them with specific examples of your contributions and the positive feedback you have received from others. Highlighting the discrepancy between your positive feedback and that specific manager's can help clarify your situation.

If you would like a more detailed discussion on your specific situation, please don't hesitate to contact me directly.

Best,

Hagen

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