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Any material to improve my CEO pitch after I solved the case?

I have been practicing cases and one of the feedback I received is to improve my CEO pitch at the end. Is there any good material focused on that aspect?

I have been practicing cases and one of the feedback I received is to improve my CEO pitch at the end. Is there any good material focused on that aspect?

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Hi,

The basic flow is the following:

  1. You ask for 30 sec to prepare the recommendation
  2. You check the original objective to make sure you are answering the right question
  3. You think of the arguments and spend 30 seconds collecting the numbers for the arguments
  4. You provide the recommendation

There are also two types of recommendations - I call them hard and soft recommendations. Let me explain what this is.

In many cases, the interviewer will interrupt you and ask for the recommendations. It does not necessarily mean something bad.

  1. Consultants want to save the time for your questions at the end of the interview. Actually, in many cases, they don't even expect you to go through the whole structure and get a final answer.
  2. Consultants may be testing several things:
  • Are you comfortable enough with providing preliminary recommendations based on limited data? (Imagine a CEO whom you met in the elevator and who wants to know the preliminary findings)
  • Will you make a mistake of providing a recommendation with a high level of certainty without having a proper supporting data?

As a result, there are two problems that you may face:

  1. In the interviewer-led cases, you have to answer the questions that the interviewer asked you and very often they don't all link up
  2. In many cases, you can't provide a definite answer since you don't have enough information and were interrupted in the middle of the case

Addressing the first problem you should:

  • Provide the recommendation for the initial objective of the case
  • Put everything else you have discussed in the additional part

For example:

  1. Our objectives were to understand why the profit is declining by X and how to bring the profit back within one year (Don't forget that your objective should be measurable in terms of money / other metric and time)
  2. According to the analysis we've done so far, my recommendation is to shut down the division A and to concentrate on the divisions b/c if we want to increase the profit, and there is a number of reasons for that.. (Remember that your arguments should include numbers).
  3. You provide the arguments a) First of all, problems in Division A are the major driver of the decline in profits - 90% of the decline in profits refer to Division A. b) Secondly, the decline is driven by the contracting market size that is shrinking at xx percent and is not expected to improve in the near future. c) Finally....
  4. Additionally, I would like to check the following... (In the last bullet, you simply provide a list of other things you have discussed, but they were not the part of the original objective / the things you slightly discussed but haven't come to any conclusion, like the questions on creativity)

As for the second problem - Indeed, in many cases, you can't provide a definite answer.

Imagine a case when you have to make a decision whether a PE fund should acquire a company. You make a proper structure (Market, Competitors, Company, Feasibility of Exit) and in 25 min of a case, you've managed only to go through the Market and Competitors branches of the analysis. What will be your recommendation?

In this case, you have to provide a Soft Recommendation:

  1. You start with an objective ("Our objective was to understand whether we should buy this company")
  2. You provide a preliminary recommendation highlighting the uncertainty("According to the limited data we have so far, our preliminary recommendation is to buy this company and there are three reasons for that..." or "Purely based on the data we have about the market it looks like it's a good idea for a number of reasons..")
  3. You provide the reasons ("First of all the market is big at X and growing at Y, Secondly the competition is fragmented with the target company having x% of the market. Thirdly...")
  4. You Mention the pieces of data that you need to provide a full recommendation ("But to come up with a final recommendation I would like to look at the company financials, key capabilities and..." or "But to be 100% sure in our recommendation we need to check...)

Best,

Vlad

Hi,

The basic flow is the following:

  1. You ask for 30 sec to prepare the recommendation
  2. You check the original objective to make sure you are answering the right question
  3. You think of the arguments and spend 30 seconds collecting the numbers for the arguments
  4. You provide the recommendation

There are also two types of recommendations - I call them hard and soft recommendations. Let me explain what this is.

In many cases, the interviewer will interrupt you and ask for the recommendations. It does not necessarily mean something bad.

  1. Consultants want to save the time for your questions at the end of the interview. Actually, in many cases, they don't even expect you to go through the whole structure and get a final answer.
  2. Consultants may be testing several things:
  • Are you comfortable enough with providing preliminary recommendations based on limited data? (Imagine a CEO whom you met in the elevator and who wants to know the preliminary findings)
  • Will you make a mistake of providing a recommendation with a high level of certainty without having a proper supporting data?

As a result, there are two problems that you may face:

  1. In the interviewer-led cases, you have to answer the questions that the interviewer asked you and very often they don't all link up
  2. In many cases, you can't provide a definite answer since you don't have enough information and were interrupted in the middle of the case

Addressing the first problem you should:

  • Provide the recommendation for the initial objective of the case
  • Put everything else you have discussed in the additional part

For example:

  1. Our objectives were to understand why the profit is declining by X and how to bring the profit back within one year (Don't forget that your objective should be measurable in terms of money / other metric and time)
  2. According to the analysis we've done so far, my recommendation is to shut down the division A and to concentrate on the divisions b/c if we want to increase the profit, and there is a number of reasons for that.. (Remember that your arguments should include numbers).
  3. You provide the arguments a) First of all, problems in Division A are the major driver of the decline in profits - 90% of the decline in profits refer to Division A. b) Secondly, the decline is driven by the contracting market size that is shrinking at xx percent and is not expected to improve in the near future. c) Finally....
  4. Additionally, I would like to check the following... (In the last bullet, you simply provide a list of other things you have discussed, but they were not the part of the original objective / the things you slightly discussed but haven't come to any conclusion, like the questions on creativity)

As for the second problem - Indeed, in many cases, you can't provide a definite answer.

Imagine a case when you have to make a decision whether a PE fund should acquire a company. You make a proper structure (Market, Competitors, Company, Feasibility of Exit) and in 25 min of a case, you've managed only to go through the Market and Competitors branches of the analysis. What will be your recommendation?

In this case, you have to provide a Soft Recommendation:

  1. You start with an objective ("Our objective was to understand whether we should buy this company")
  2. You provide a preliminary recommendation highlighting the uncertainty("According to the limited data we have so far, our preliminary recommendation is to buy this company and there are three reasons for that..." or "Purely based on the data we have about the market it looks like it's a good idea for a number of reasons..")
  3. You provide the reasons ("First of all the market is big at X and growing at Y, Secondly the competition is fragmented with the target company having x% of the market. Thirdly...")
  4. You Mention the pieces of data that you need to provide a full recommendation ("But to come up with a final recommendation I would like to look at the company financials, key capabilities and..." or "But to be 100% sure in our recommendation we need to check...)

Best,

Vlad

Hi Ankit,

This is a great question and actually many candidates suffer from this problem. There are several case preparation materials that you may find helpful, such as Victor Cheng's website and the MConsultingPrep youtube channel. However, these public online resources only go so far in helping you improve your "CEO pitch". Guidance you can find there are mostly generic and does not apply to YOUR specific case. The best way to improve is to, as you are already doing, practice with friends/experts and ask for their feedback.

Did the person who gave you that feedback specify what part of your "CEO pitch" needs to be improved? If not, it may be helpful to reach out to that person and ask for more detailed feedback. Simply saying "you need to improve your CEO pitch" is a little too generic and does not point to actionable next steps.

Here are some general guidelines in terms of how a good pitch should look like (from my perspective), and you can potentially benchmark your performance against it.

1. Delivery:

  • Tone: Is your tone positive? Does it convey confidence?
  • Speed: are you talking at the right speed, so that your pitch isn't taking too long to complete but the interviewer can easily follow?
  • Precision: are you using the most concise and precise language to deliver your points?

2. Content:

  • Relevance: is your recommention relevant to the case? Does the CEO care about what you are saying?
  • Structure: is your recommendation given in a structured way?
  • Logic and Data: is your logic sound and is there enough data to back up your arguments?
  • Next Steps: does your recommendation include next steps and risks to consider?

Hope this is helpful. Feel free to message me if you would like to discuss in more details.

Hi Ankit,

This is a great question and actually many candidates suffer from this problem. There are several case preparation materials that you may find helpful, such as Victor Cheng's website and the MConsultingPrep youtube channel. However, these public online resources only go so far in helping you improve your "CEO pitch". Guidance you can find there are mostly generic and does not apply to YOUR specific case. The best way to improve is to, as you are already doing, practice with friends/experts and ask for their feedback.

Did the person who gave you that feedback specify what part of your "CEO pitch" needs to be improved? If not, it may be helpful to reach out to that person and ask for more detailed feedback. Simply saying "you need to improve your CEO pitch" is a little too generic and does not point to actionable next steps.

Here are some general guidelines in terms of how a good pitch should look like (from my perspective), and you can potentially benchmark your performance against it.

1. Delivery:

  • Tone: Is your tone positive? Does it convey confidence?
  • Speed: are you talking at the right speed, so that your pitch isn't taking too long to complete but the interviewer can easily follow?
  • Precision: are you using the most concise and precise language to deliver your points?

2. Content:

  • Relevance: is your recommention relevant to the case? Does the CEO care about what you are saying?
  • Structure: is your recommendation given in a structured way?
  • Logic and Data: is your logic sound and is there enough data to back up your arguments?
  • Next Steps: does your recommendation include next steps and risks to consider?

Hope this is helpful. Feel free to message me if you would like to discuss in more details.

(edited)

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