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Ken

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7

Mckinsey Final Round

Hi!

I just had the first interview of the final round at McKinsey and I'm not sure if i will make it. I'm currently working in another sector (at a law firm) but my dream job was always McKinsey.

The feedback I received from previous rounds was that my PEI was incredibly strong and I was really good at math but sometimes i rushed on calculations and I should take a pause and do it slowly.

Then, the first interview of the final round happened:

PEI: I told a story about how i faced one of the biggest problem my office had to face and i came up with a conclusion that not only saved the day but changed the way the whole industry works (not only our client). The partner asked me what was the complex part in that because the way i told him seemed pretty easy. I somehow managed to say that simple ideas usually seem easy a posteriori, but wasn't at that moment (i.e Facebook).

Case: did pretty well until the maths. i had to calculate three diferrent things then add them together and compare it with other data. I asked for 30 seconds to think the approach and realize i needed one extra data; which he provided me. I started the calculations and everything was smooth until the last thing i had to calculate. I came up with a equation (which was correct) and screw up multiplying something like 3x2 so the answer didn't make sense which i said outloud. I asked for a second and change my mind and design another different equation and solved it well but the partner told me that it was better the first one so i went back at it, realized where i made the mistake and solve it perfeclty and connected the numbers with my framework and other data. Everything else was correct.

Edit: i guided my interviewer during all my calculations and stated the things i was going to do before even starting to do them

Did i bomb the interview?

Hi!

I just had the first interview of the final round at McKinsey and I'm not sure if i will make it. I'm currently working in another sector (at a law firm) but my dream job was always McKinsey.

The feedback I received from previous rounds was that my PEI was incredibly strong and I was really good at math but sometimes i rushed on calculations and I should take a pause and do it slowly.

Then, the first interview of the final round happened:

PEI: I told a story about how i faced one of the biggest problem my office had to face and i came up with a conclusion that not only saved the day but changed the way the whole industry works (not only our client). The partner asked me what was the complex part in that because the way i told him seemed pretty easy. I somehow managed to say that simple ideas usually seem easy a posteriori, but wasn't at that moment (i.e Facebook).

Case: did pretty well until the maths. i had to calculate three diferrent things then add them together and compare it with other data. I asked for 30 seconds to think the approach and realize i needed one extra data; which he provided me. I started the calculations and everything was smooth until the last thing i had to calculate. I came up with a equation (which was correct) and screw up multiplying something like 3x2 so the answer didn't make sense which i said outloud. I asked for a second and change my mind and design another different equation and solved it well but the partner told me that it was better the first one so i went back at it, realized where i made the mistake and solve it perfeclty and connected the numbers with my framework and other data. Everything else was correct.

Edit: i guided my interviewer during all my calculations and stated the things i was going to do before even starting to do them

Did i bomb the interview?

(edited)

7 answers

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Book a coaching with Ken

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Never speculate! But if you want us to, I would say you haven't "bombed" it, assuming other sections of the case went well.

If I were in your shoes, I would definitely spend time refining the 'story telling" for your PEI. It's quite common that strong candidates tell their story in such a simplified way where an interviewer does wonder "was this really the most challening situation when you did x?". A good story always needs a little drama and emotion!

On the maths, it sounds much more like your mindset than capability. Having said that, the only way to regain your confidence is most often more practice. I would find a practice partner (or coach) and just spend an hour or two just going through the verbal quant sections of McKinsey type cases. It's done the trick with many candidates I've worked with who were in your exact shoes :)

Good luck!

Never speculate! But if you want us to, I would say you haven't "bombed" it, assuming other sections of the case went well.

If I were in your shoes, I would definitely spend time refining the 'story telling" for your PEI. It's quite common that strong candidates tell their story in such a simplified way where an interviewer does wonder "was this really the most challening situation when you did x?". A good story always needs a little drama and emotion!

On the maths, it sounds much more like your mindset than capability. Having said that, the only way to regain your confidence is most often more practice. I would find a practice partner (or coach) and just spend an hour or two just going through the verbal quant sections of McKinsey type cases. It's done the trick with many candidates I've worked with who were in your exact shoes :)

Good luck!

(edited)

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Hi there,

The truth is, no one knows for sure (but the partner ;)). The perception of a candidate is often subjective. You may feel you have done great and be rejected and the other way around.

There seem to be improvements in both PEI and case, but hard to say if they can lead to rejection without having seen your overall performance live.

In any case, trying to guess the outcome can't really help at this point. I would focus instead on the improvements you already identified on PEI and math and on doing your best in the last part of the final.

Good luck!

Francesco

Hi there,

The truth is, no one knows for sure (but the partner ;)). The perception of a candidate is often subjective. You may feel you have done great and be rejected and the other way around.

There seem to be improvements in both PEI and case, but hard to say if they can lead to rejection without having seen your overall performance live.

In any case, trying to guess the outcome can't really help at this point. I would focus instead on the improvements you already identified on PEI and math and on doing your best in the last part of the final.

Good luck!

Francesco

From your description, sounds like you did well. I think you're overthinking.

However, I think the partner's expression to your problem-solving process reveals a lot more about your interview than random strangers guessing on the internet.

From your description, sounds like you did well. I think you're overthinking.

However, I think the partner's expression to your problem-solving process reveals a lot more about your interview than random strangers guessing on the internet.

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Hello there!

Based on what you wrote, it is difficult to assume that you did well or bad, but considering what you mentioned, in my subjective opinion, you did an excellent job. If you feel unsure about something, just work on these improvement zones. In any case, any experience is an experience, good or bad. And as your story shows, it is definitely worth to go through, because you are already in the final with one foot. Good luck to you!
 

Hello there!

Based on what you wrote, it is difficult to assume that you did well or bad, but considering what you mentioned, in my subjective opinion, you did an excellent job. If you feel unsure about something, just work on these improvement zones. In any case, any experience is an experience, good or bad. And as your story shows, it is definitely worth to go through, because you are already in the final with one foot. Good luck to you!
 

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Hi there,

I'm really sorry but we truly have no idea what will happen next - only you and the interviewer were there, not us!

However, it does sound as if you did well. Did you do well enough? Time will tell.

Regardless, the fact that you've made it to the final round of such a prestigious firm is already something to be proud of in-and-of-itself.

Fingers crossed for you, but if you don't make it, please don't get dismayed...you clearly have a lot going for you!

Hi there,

I'm really sorry but we truly have no idea what will happen next - only you and the interviewer were there, not us!

However, it does sound as if you did well. Did you do well enough? Time will tell.

Regardless, the fact that you've made it to the final round of such a prestigious firm is already something to be proud of in-and-of-itself.

Fingers crossed for you, but if you don't make it, please don't get dismayed...you clearly have a lot going for you!

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Hi, it looks like a good performance :) Let's cross the fingers

Best,
Antonello

Hi, it looks like a good performance :) Let's cross the fingers

Best,
Antonello

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Hi there,

From your description, it seems to be an ok performance. However, it is hard to tell if you were not there for several reasons

  1. I am not sure if the story you are telling hits one of the three PEI dimensions. It could very well be that you had a significant impact in an industry, yet if the story misses the exact dimensions that McKinsey is looking for it could still lead to rejection.
  2. The way you are explaining the math issues you faced does not necessarily warrant a rejection, however, it depends on the overall feedback through all rounds. If you have been told to pay close attention to this since it has been already flagged and discussed by several interviewers before it could be a potential issue
  3. You leave out all other parts of the case. From experience, candidates often have a hard time self-evaluating. It could very well be that in the eyes of the partner math went excellent, however, on the structuring side of things, for instance, they were not happy

A lot of unknowns. My hunch is that it went fine, however, without actually being there it is very hard to tell. You should soon know!

Fingers crossed!

Cheers,

Florian

Hi there,

From your description, it seems to be an ok performance. However, it is hard to tell if you were not there for several reasons

  1. I am not sure if the story you are telling hits one of the three PEI dimensions. It could very well be that you had a significant impact in an industry, yet if the story misses the exact dimensions that McKinsey is looking for it could still lead to rejection.
  2. The way you are explaining the math issues you faced does not necessarily warrant a rejection, however, it depends on the overall feedback through all rounds. If you have been told to pay close attention to this since it has been already flagged and discussed by several interviewers before it could be a potential issue
  3. You leave out all other parts of the case. From experience, candidates often have a hard time self-evaluating. It could very well be that in the eyes of the partner math went excellent, however, on the structuring side of things, for instance, they were not happy

A lot of unknowns. My hunch is that it went fine, however, without actually being there it is very hard to tell. You should soon know!

Fingers crossed!

Cheers,

Florian

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