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exit exit opportunities
New answer on Nov 28, 2023
10 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Nov 09, 2023

Seeing as many coaches on this platform and others left consulting to pursue their own ventures or other opportunities, I would be interested to know what was the main drivers for doing so? Greatly appreciate any insights shared

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Raj
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replied on Nov 28, 2023
FREE 15MIN CONSULTATION | #1 Strategy& / OW coach | >70 5* reviews |90% offers ⇨ prep-success.super.site | MENA, DE, UK

Entrepreneurial Spirit: Many consultants possess a strong entrepreneurial drive and desire to build something of their own. They may have identified a business opportunity or have a passion for a specific industry or product, prompting them to leave consulting and start their own venture.

Work-Life Balance: Consulting can be demanding, with long hours and extensive travel. Some consultants choose to leave the industry to prioritize their personal lives, seeking a better work-life balance and more control over their schedules.

Industry Specialization: Over time, consultants may develop a deep expertise in a specific industry or function. This expertise can open doors to exciting opportunities outside of consulting, such as joining a company in a leadership role or pursuing a career in private equity or venture capital.

Desire for Industry Experience: While consulting offers exposure to various industries, some consultants may decide to leave in order to gain hands-on experience within a specific sector. This allows them to deepen their knowledge and become subject matter experts in their chosen field.

  1.  


 

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Benjamin
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replied on Nov 26, 2023
Ex-BCG Principal | 8+ years consulting experience in SEA | BCG top interviewer & top performer

Hi,

This is a great question. Objectively speaking, there are 2 drivers for leaving consulting

  1. Voluntarily → people leave of their own accord
  2. Involuntarily → people are counselled out. Very rarely, if ever, will people acknowledge this publicly, but it does happen

I guess you are talking about scenario #1, which is the more common case. Stay long enough and you get to a point where you have to decide if you want to be an equity partner or not. I left as Principal, and the next big step was equity partner. 

Ultimately I decided that becoming a partner wasn't a goal for me (also the job starts to change quite significantly after Principal), so I left. 

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Aude
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updated an answer on Nov 11, 2023
Ex-BCG | Ex-EY | Ex-PwC | Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York, Central & Latin America

Hi there,

I tend to think “Once a consultant, always a consultant” but anyways here are a few pointers:

Work-Life Balance:  A desire for more predictable hours and less constant travel can drive this decision (Although travel has been reduced since Covid and many projects are now conducted remotely)

Career Specialization: Some individuals may wish to deepen their expertise in a specific industry or function, which can be challenging within the generalist nature of consulting.

Desire for Stability: Some  prefer the stability of a permanent role with a steady income and the opportunity for long-term career growth within a single organization.

Entrepreneurial Pursuits: After consulting career, it is tempting to want to leverage problem-solving skills to start your own businesses or join startups, seeking the autonomy of entrepreneurship.

Values Alignment: Transitioning to an industry or organization that resonates more with their values can be a compelling reason for leaving consulting.

Personally, I left consulting back in 2016 because I had an offer from the Board Member of a Japanese Conglomerate to come and join their team in Tokyo, which I felt I couldn’t refuse. I went back eventually and left again during the Pandemic to start my own coffee shop…which I successfully sold within 6 months and joined MBB later. 

Hope this is helpful :)

 

Aude Augias

(edited)

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Dennis
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replied on Nov 26, 2023
Ex-Roland Berger|Project Manager and Recruiter|7+ years of consulting experience in USA and Europe

Hi,

in my case I reached a point where I did not find the remaining career steps (principal/junior partner, partner) very appealing after having been able to observe the day-to-day of the people in those roles. I also wanted more free time and flexibility than the consulting job allowed for.

It was a worthwhile experience for me that I do not want to miss but I'm also fine leaving it at that. 

Best

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Alberto
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replied on Nov 12, 2023
Ex-McKinsey Associate Partner | +15 years in consulting | +200 McKinsey 1st & 2nd round interviews

Hi there,

In my case, after 15 years in consulting, I was looking for something different with more freedom, flexibility, better lifestyle and the capacity to create something from scratch.

Best,

Alberto

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Cristian
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replied on Nov 11, 2023
#1 rated MBB & McKinsey Coach

Hi!

That's a cool question. 

For me, it was the realisation that I could become Partner but I didn't want to become Partner. 

I didn't mind the lifestyle as much. And I found the intellectual aspect of consulting stimulating. But at the end of the day, I couldn't get over the fact that it was about maximising profits in 80% of cases (less so about building ‘better products’, ‘sustainable futures’ and so on). 

From there I started getting more honest with myself as to what I actually wanted. 

Good luck!
Cristian

———————————————

Practicing for interviews? Check out my latest case based on a first-round MBB interview >>> CodeWave  

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Nicolas
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replied on Nov 10, 2023
30% off 1st coaching Promo | #1 Canada Coach | 10y+ Coaching & recruiting | BCG + Industry Executive | INSEAD MBA

Hello, 

I think it comes down to what you value and where you want to focus. On my end, I found BCG to be an AMAZING school to accelerate learning, skills, industry & executive exposure, insights & communication … but looking at how the job evolves over the years, it didn't fit what I found interesting. 

1- When you become more senior in Consulting, your lifestyle doesn't really improve: still work 65+ hr per week, travel, always on call (Of course, lot more money too) => That lead me to decide I was not interested in continuing toward Partner track

2- Knowing I wanted to leave, I then evaluated the WHEN: looking at exit opportunities and skillset required for more senior roles in industry → e.g. Does staying 1 more year in Consulting result in 1 or more year of Tenure conversion in Industry in desired?? 

Requirements I assessed were: 
- Managed a team: You don't learn that in Consulting, you learn to manage a PROJECT team on deliverables, but not as a Manager (e.g. 1 person leave, you ask for another consultant, don't manage full HR process + recruitment, etc)
- Managed a P&L: You don't really do that in Consulting unless MD & Office lead → You manage a project budget 

As staying for more years was not going to allow me to check the boxes I needed to move ahead in my POST BCG career, I assessed it was better to move out now and get experience in a field that would tick the boxes :) 
 

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Ian
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replied on Nov 10, 2023
#1 BCG coach | MBB | Tier 2 | Digital, Tech, Platinion | 100% personal success rate (8/8) | 95% candidate success rate

BCG was the best experience I never want to have again.

If I went back in time, I would 100% do it again. But I will never do it again in this lifetime.

It's the marines. You become your best professional self there. The training, the learning, the network, the brand, the experience, the people.

But, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to know why people leave…

You tell me if 60+ weekly hours, flying most weeks, high-stakes topics always hanging over your head, all sounds sustainable or not?

Some people live for this. Others don't.

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Frederic
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replied on Nov 09, 2023
ex Jr. Partner McKinsey |Senior Interviewer| Real Feedback & Free Homework between sessions|Harvard Coach|10+ Experience

Manifold ;-) for me among others entrepreneurial spirit, more freedom, and strive for new challenges. Let's have a coffee chat to share more. Warm regards, Frederic

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Nikita
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replied on Nov 14, 2023
MBB & Tier2 preparation | 90+ offers | 7 years coaching | 2000+ sessions | PDF reviews attached

Great question!

Personally, ever since starting at the corporate world, I always kind of knew it was just a temporary thing for me. I just didn't see myself working at the office all my life and reaching the partner level.

Since I've become self employed 5,5 years ago, I've tried several personal projects (tourism & hospitality sphere since I've always enjoyed travelling). I even considered going back to the corporate world a few times, but not anymore. I just enjoy my freedom too much, even with all the downsides that come with it.

Regards,
Nick
 

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Raj gave the best answer

Raj

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