Backing out from an offer

Job offer Middle East
New answer on Dec 31, 2020
7 Answers
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Anonymous A asked on Nov 30, 2020

Hello,

I was wondering how bad is it to back out from an offer after accepting it? Are there any circumstances where this might be acceptable and doesn't reflect badly on the candidate?

Thanks,

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Gaurav
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replied on Nov 30, 2020
Ex-Mckinsey|Certified Career Coach |Placed 500+ candidates at MBB & other consultancies

Hi there,

it depends on the reason why you have done it and the firm.
The thing is to be transparent with them, and I don't think that would be a problem when applying in the future, probably it turns into one more question to be asked at the next interviews

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GB.

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Antonello
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replied on Nov 30, 2020
McKinsey | MBA professor for consulting interviews

Hi, it's pretty common for candidates who receive multiple offers spread in many weeks

Best,
Anto

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Adi
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replied on Nov 30, 2020
Accenture, Deloitte | Precision Case Prep | Experienced Interviewer & Career Coach | 15 years professional experience

Technically its okay. But have a good reason to back up why you did what you did, apologise to HR and write to the hiring manager directly. Offer to recommend/refer someone you know who could fit the role. You dont want any bad feelings and/or misunderstandings.

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Vlad
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replied on Nov 30, 2020
McKinsey / Accenture Alum / Got all BIG3 offers / Harvard Business School

Hi,

Should not be a problem unless you are an MBA student and it's a part of on-campus recruiting. In the case of an MBA - you should better talk with your school first

Best

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Anonymous replied on Dec 31, 2020

Hi,

It depends in what do you mean by accepting it. If you already said yes then backing out from it requires a very strong reason to avoid burning the bridge.

However, if you merely just receive an offer and have not commit anything, it is pretty common and should not be an issue.

Best,
Iman

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Ian
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replied on Dec 01, 2020
MBB | 100% personal interview success rate (8/8) and 95% candidate success rate | Personalized interview prep

Hi there,

While it's not great etiquette-wise, it happens a lot during recruiting season.

If there is another offer you like better, you ultimately need to pick you first. Unfortunately, it "reflects badly" no matter what you do. Just accept that that company will not be very happy and you've burned that bridge. If there's another bridge that you like better, it's the price you have to pay.

Be very careful if you are recruiting through your school (undergrad, MBA, PhD, etc.). If you are, thentalk to the career counselors/career office about the best way to go about this.

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Francesco
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replied on Dec 01, 2020
#1 Coach for Sessions (4.000+) | 1.500+ 5-Star Reviews | Proven Success (➡ InterviewOffers.com) | Ex BCG | 9Y+ Coaching

Hi there,

The company extending the offer will never like it, no matter the reason. It is not uncommon in consulting though, in particular in the recruiting period and for Tier 2 vs MBB.

There is no much you can do to mitigate it. I would recommend to call HR first, explain the reason and then follow up via email so that there is something in writing as well. You should also check there are no consequences in the contract you signed.

Best,

Francesco

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Gaurav gave the best answer

Gaurav

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