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Emily

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Reason of quitting job

Dear community, I have one interview question that I would like to seek advice: why did you leave your last job?

I am currently preparing the application of consulting firms in the US, after staying just several months in my last role. The reason I left the job was mainly due to my supervisor who I didn't work along well together. I'd like to hear any advice and also views on below replies:

(1) I was not the best fit with my boss (a more direct answer but could sound very negative? What are the typical reactions of interviewers if they've heard this answer? Do they really care why one left a job or they focus more on motivation and case interview?)

(2) Did not fit into the corporate or team culture (sounds a bit vague and also negative?)

(3) I wanted to switch function since the previous function provides less learning opportunity. The skillsets are capped and not related to consulting. So I decided to quit the job and prepare for consulting, an area that I really enjoy. (not sure whether quitting job to prepare for consulting sounds persuasive...maybe some risk-takers might do the same thing?)

Thanks for your advice!

Dear community, I have one interview question that I would like to seek advice: why did you leave your last job?

I am currently preparing the application of consulting firms in the US, after staying just several months in my last role. The reason I left the job was mainly due to my supervisor who I didn't work along well together. I'd like to hear any advice and also views on below replies:

(1) I was not the best fit with my boss (a more direct answer but could sound very negative? What are the typical reactions of interviewers if they've heard this answer? Do they really care why one left a job or they focus more on motivation and case interview?)

(2) Did not fit into the corporate or team culture (sounds a bit vague and also negative?)

(3) I wanted to switch function since the previous function provides less learning opportunity. The skillsets are capped and not related to consulting. So I decided to quit the job and prepare for consulting, an area that I really enjoy. (not sure whether quitting job to prepare for consulting sounds persuasive...maybe some risk-takers might do the same thing?)

Thanks for your advice!

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Book a coaching with Emily

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Hi there,

Just sharing my 2 cents below.

(1) Fit with boss - I would avoid talking about this point, unless there is a glaring issue with your boss e.g. ethical problem (even then it needs to be a very clear, black-and-white case). Otherwise it could easily backfire and might sometimes raise concern about your ability to work with difficult person which you could run into from time to time in consulting, esp with client

(2) Fit with the culture - I think this is a legit reason. Just make sure you can articulate clearly what you don't like about the culture and what would be the culture that you can thrive in. Personally I left a job before due to a culture mismatch. I was very transparent during my interviews regarding this reason of leaving and it was well received by all the firms I interviewed

(3) Function / learning - This is probably the best (or easily acceptable) reason out of the 3 options you laid out. Explain what you want to learn from consulting work and how it could help you for longer term career.

Cheers,

Emily

Hi there,

Just sharing my 2 cents below.

(1) Fit with boss - I would avoid talking about this point, unless there is a glaring issue with your boss e.g. ethical problem (even then it needs to be a very clear, black-and-white case). Otherwise it could easily backfire and might sometimes raise concern about your ability to work with difficult person which you could run into from time to time in consulting, esp with client

(2) Fit with the culture - I think this is a legit reason. Just make sure you can articulate clearly what you don't like about the culture and what would be the culture that you can thrive in. Personally I left a job before due to a culture mismatch. I was very transparent during my interviews regarding this reason of leaving and it was well received by all the firms I interviewed

(3) Function / learning - This is probably the best (or easily acceptable) reason out of the 3 options you laid out. Explain what you want to learn from consulting work and how it could help you for longer term career.

Cheers,

Emily

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Hello!

Indeed, they will ask you this question if you only stayed some months.

From my personal experience -I always ask this when I see that people stayed less than 1.5 years in the last role-, it´s quite easy to tell when someone is being honest about the topic and when someone has something to hide, which generates a big lack of trust.

Hence, I would be honest about it, and tell the reasons why you did not work well with this person in a professional and respectful way. It will not leave you out, and you will earn trust. Don´t make up a paralell story, it´s ok to have people with whom you don´t work fine.

Hope it helps.

Cheers,

Clara

Hello!

Indeed, they will ask you this question if you only stayed some months.

From my personal experience -I always ask this when I see that people stayed less than 1.5 years in the last role-, it´s quite easy to tell when someone is being honest about the topic and when someone has something to hide, which generates a big lack of trust.

Hence, I would be honest about it, and tell the reasons why you did not work well with this person in a professional and respectful way. It will not leave you out, and you will earn trust. Don´t make up a paralell story, it´s ok to have people with whom you don´t work fine.

Hope it helps.

Cheers,

Clara

Would you disclose that you had a great time at your previous company and you did well, but you had many personal challenges which you needed to overcome. Now after having overcome these personal challenges, I understand myself much better, have more empathy for others, communicate more effectively, and negotiate and collaborate with others quite well. — Anonymous B on Mar 29, 2021

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Hello there,

Generally, the rule of thumb of every interviews is to never provide any negative statements towards your previous employer, except in certain cases such as personal harrassment. More so in management consulting sector as client management is a key skillset expected of a candidate.

Clients in this case varied from friendly to aggresive. An effective consultant is expected to be able to get buy-ins from most of clients, irrespective of their profiles and tendencies.

As such, I agree with the approach of focusing on why consulting is such an interesting prospect for you, perhaps you are interested in the multi-industry and cross-functional exposure as well as the fast-paced, intellectually satisfying, and high-impact work.

Hence, the third answer would be the most suitable. Of course, revising it to be more convincing and decisive will be even better.

Hope it helps.
Wish you all the best.

Kind regards,
Nathan

Hello there,

Generally, the rule of thumb of every interviews is to never provide any negative statements towards your previous employer, except in certain cases such as personal harrassment. More so in management consulting sector as client management is a key skillset expected of a candidate.

Clients in this case varied from friendly to aggresive. An effective consultant is expected to be able to get buy-ins from most of clients, irrespective of their profiles and tendencies.

As such, I agree with the approach of focusing on why consulting is such an interesting prospect for you, perhaps you are interested in the multi-industry and cross-functional exposure as well as the fast-paced, intellectually satisfying, and high-impact work.

Hence, the third answer would be the most suitable. Of course, revising it to be more convincing and decisive will be even better.

Hope it helps.
Wish you all the best.

Kind regards,
Nathan

(edited)

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Hello,

It would be better to link this answer to your motivations for joining consulting. For example you can say that you are looking for a dynamic job that challenges you everyday and that gives you the possibility to improve professionally. And consulting is simply better than other jobs from this point of view.

Best,
Luca

Hello,

It would be better to link this answer to your motivations for joining consulting. For example you can say that you are looking for a dynamic job that challenges you everyday and that gives you the possibility to improve professionally. And consulting is simply better than other jobs from this point of view.

Best,
Luca

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Hi,
I would avoid talking about negative aspects of your past employer. I like your point about learning curve and I would talk about all the aspects that in consulting are much stressed (culture of feedback? clear growth path? executives exposure? ...)

Hope it helps,
Antonello

Hi,
I would avoid talking about negative aspects of your past employer. I like your point about learning curve and I would talk about all the aspects that in consulting are much stressed (culture of feedback? clear growth path? executives exposure? ...)

Hope it helps,
Antonello

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