Cookie and Privacy Settings

This website uses cookies to enable essential functions like the user login and sessions. We also use cookies and third-party tools to improve your surfing experience on preplounge.com. You can choose to activate only essential cookies or all cookies. You can always change your preference in the cookie and privacy settings. This link can also be found in the footer of the site. If you need more information, please visit our privacy policy.

Data processing in the USA: By clicking on "I accept", you also consent, in accordance with article 49 paragraph 1 sentence 1 lit. GDPR, to your data being processed in the USA (by Google LLC, Facebook Inc., LinkedIn Inc., Stripe, Paypal).

Manage settings individually I accept
expert
Expert with best answer

Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

291 Meetings

25,035 Q&A Upvotes

USD 289 / Coaching

4

Estimate number of hospital beds in the Uk

I'm confused if I should do a top-bottom approach or the bottom top approach. Please see my structure and share your feedback.
1-start with population

2- segment base on age groups (children, middle, old)

3-frequency of vists in each group

4- percentage that will be emitted into hospital to stay for a night or more . ( surgery or baby delivery or just people who are sick and need care)

5- duration of each visit (how many nights will they spend?)

6- add them all up to know demand for hospitals.
7- estimate capacity of one hospital ( don't know how to do that! Please help)

8- divide demand over capacity of one hospital.

please share feedback and suggest any other approach. I feel like my approach is a bit complicated and I would appreciate it if there were any thoughts on how to have a simpler and clearer approach.

I'm confused if I should do a top-bottom approach or the bottom top approach. Please see my structure and share your feedback.
1-start with population

2- segment base on age groups (children, middle, old)

3-frequency of vists in each group

4- percentage that will be emitted into hospital to stay for a night or more . ( surgery or baby delivery or just people who are sick and need care)

5- duration of each visit (how many nights will they spend?)

6- add them all up to know demand for hospitals.
7- estimate capacity of one hospital ( don't know how to do that! Please help)

8- divide demand over capacity of one hospital.

please share feedback and suggest any other approach. I feel like my approach is a bit complicated and I would appreciate it if there were any thoughts on how to have a simpler and clearer approach.

4 answers

  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Best Answer
Book a coaching with Ian

100% Recommendation Rate

291 Meetings

25,035 Q&A Upvotes

USD 289 / Coaching

Hi there,

This approach absolutely works! I agree that top-down does work well (and would be my preferred option as well)

If you wanted to do bottom-up, basically you'd want to estimate the number of towns, small cities, medium cities, and large cities (London). Then, for each of them, think about how many hostpitals, of what average size (# of beds) and multiply it out!

Hi there,

This approach absolutely works! I agree that top-down does work well (and would be my preferred option as well)

If you wanted to do bottom-up, basically you'd want to estimate the number of towns, small cities, medium cities, and large cities (London). Then, for each of them, think about how many hostpitals, of what average size (# of beds) and multiply it out!

Book a coaching with Henning

100% Recommendation Rate

182 Meetings

5,481 Q&A Upvotes

USD 189 / Coaching

I think this approach makes sense. To get to the capacity, I would probably flip it around - assume a utilization (incl. spare capacity) to get to the full capacity and scale up demand to total number of beds.

As an example: If you get to 100k hospital bed demand following you steps 1-6, you can estimate a 1/3 spare capacity (or only 2/3 occupied at any given time). Divide 100k over 2/3 and gt to 150k hospital beds.

I think this approach makes sense. To get to the capacity, I would probably flip it around - assume a utilization (incl. spare capacity) to get to the full capacity and scale up demand to total number of beds.

As an example: If you get to 100k hospital bed demand following you steps 1-6, you can estimate a 1/3 spare capacity (or only 2/3 occupied at any given time). Divide 100k over 2/3 and gt to 150k hospital beds.

Book a coaching with Clara

100% Recommendation Rate

59 Meetings

16,242 Q&A Upvotes

USD 229 / Coaching

Hello!

Your approach is really solid!

However, you need quite some detailed data there (e.g., estimation of number of visits that each age group does to the hospital, etc.), for which you should remember to problem-solve with the interviewer.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

Hello!

Your approach is really solid!

However, you need quite some detailed data there (e.g., estimation of number of visits that each age group does to the hospital, etc.), for which you should remember to problem-solve with the interviewer.

Hope it helps!

Cheers,

Clara

Related case(s)

Bain case: Asian lubricants producer

Solved 164.5k times
Bain case: Asian lubricants producer LubricantsCo, a very successful Asian premium producer of lubricants in their native region, would like to further increase their revenue and profit. The product range ranges from lubricants in the automotive sector (e.g. motor and gear oil) to industrial applications (e.g. fats, heavy-duty oils). According to preliminary examinations, further growth potentials in the Asian core market are rather limited. Thus, LubricantsCo would like to investigate options to internationalize in the passenger car business – also outside the premium segment which is given priority. Therefore, your consulting firm was instructed to elaborate a market entry strategy for the European market.  
4.6 5 29686
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

LubricantsCo, a very successful Asian premium producer of lubricants in their native region, would like to further increase their revenue and profit. The product range ranges from lubricants in the automotive sector (e.g. motor and gear oil) to industrial applications (e.g. fats, heavy-duty oils). ... Open whole case

Oliver Wyman case: Full Electrons Ahead

Solved 103.0k times
Oliver Wyman case: Full Electrons Ahead Your client, large automotive OEM WyCar, has developed its first fully electric vehicle (EV) and introduced it as a pilot on the Austrian market last year. However, sales have been far below the expected numbers. The management has engaged you to support them in understanding the reasons and advise them on how to adjust the product offering.
4.6 5 6560
| Rating: (4.6 / 5.0)

Your client, large automotive OEM WyCar, has developed its first fully electric vehicle (EV) and introduced it as a pilot on the Austrian market last year. However, sales have been far below the expected numbers. The management has engaged you to support them in understanding the reasons and advise ... Open whole case

Bain Case: Old Winery

Solved 71.4k times
Bain Case: Old Winery You have inherited the “Old Winery” from your grandfather, a winery that has been family-owned for five generations and can be dated back to the 16th century. Half of the eleven hectares are used to grow white grapes, the other half to grow red grapes. They are grown in a conventional way, i.e. they are not organically farmed and certified. The vine stocks are in a good condition regarding age and care. Overall, the only ¼ of the harvest is made into wine by the winery itself; the rest is sold. Your grandfather never wanted to change the image of the winery and left the managerial and administrative task to a young and energetic wine-maker. Due to the not so well-known brand, the demand for the “Old Winery” wine is currently rather low. You do not intent to run the winery operatively, given your limited knowledge of winemaking, but find the idea of owning a winery exciting. Your plan is to give the winery some fresh impetus.
4.4 5 1944
| Rating: (4.4 / 5.0)

You have inherited the “Old Winery” from your grandfather, a winery that has been family-owned for five generations and can be dated back to the 16th century. Half of the eleven hectares are used to grow white grapes, the other half to grow red grapes. They are grown in a conventional way, i.e. the ... Open whole case

Oliver Wyman Case: Setting up a Wine Cellar

Solved 61.7k times
Oliver Wyman Case: Setting up a Wine Cellar I’m thinking about setting up a wine cellar in my basement. The way I see it, shelf space would be divided into two sections: (1) a “drinking” section where I store bottles for my own consumption and (2) an “investment” section where I store bottles that I intend to sell at a profit after they appreciate in value several years down the line. The idea is to earn enough money with the “investment” section of the cellar in order to subsidize whatever I consume in the “drinking” section over time.   I'm obviously constrained by several things: the amount of money I am able to spend, the amount of wine I can (or want to) drink, the space available for the cellar, and so on.
4.3 5 3629
| Rating: (4.3 / 5.0)

I’m thinking about setting up a wine cellar in my basement. The way I see it, shelf space would be divided into two sections: (1) a “drinking” section where I store bottles for my own consumption and (2) an “investment” section where I store bottles that I intend to sell at a profit after they appre ... Open whole case

Roland Berger Case: Onlinestar

Solved 50.8k times
Roland Berger Case: Onlinestar Onlinestar, an online retailer of furniture and garden products (core business), has grown significantly in recent years as a result of an expansion of its product portfolio. The company mainly imports goods from Chinese manufacturers but also operates its own production of cat lavatories (special business) in Eastern Europe. The company sells its goods via Amazon and eBay, and recently via an online shop on its website. Despite this development, the financial ratios have deteriorated in recent years. In particular, the gross profit margin decreased significantly. Combined with a significant increase in shipping costs, this led to a negative result for the first time in the recently ended fiscal year and a resulting strained financial situation. Against the background of expected stagnating sales for the current financial year, short-term action is required. The board of Onlinestar asks you for an analysis of the reasons for the negative result as well as a derived recommendation for action. As a consultant, you should bring in your knowledge in online trading and develop solutions. In addition, the management board would like to receive a sales and gross profit plan from you for the current financial year.
4.3 5 1059
| Rating: (4.3 / 5.0)

Onlinestar, an online retailer of furniture and garden products (core business), has grown significantly in recent years as a result of an expansion of its product portfolio. The company mainly imports goods from Chinese manufacturers but also operates its own production of cat lavatories (special b ... Open whole case