Current BCG Active Project Leader |Former A.T. Kearney |+8Y of consulting experience | Received 7 consulting offers in the past 2Y
Book a coaching

Presentation for final round interview?

Anonymous A

I'm in the application process for a very small niche consulting group within the industrials (metals) space, and moved through two phone interview rounds with the general manager and head of the consulting division. For the final round, they have asked me to prepare a presentation to give to about 3-4 senior people, followed by Q&A. The details are as follows:

Prepare a presentation on a subject of your choice which establishes a situation that represents a problem to a client and describes an approach to identifying / quantifying a solution and giving a solution.

I already have a topic in mind but am not sure how to give this presentation in a consulting approach since I have working in market research the past few years and don't have consulting experience. My topic will be related to "market entry" so would it be fair to structure my presentation in a manner consistent with how a typical market entry case would unfold (i.e. questions about the company, market sizing and competitive landscape, which entry strategy to use, etc.)?

(edited)

  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Hugo
Expert
replied on 09/13/2017
Current BCG Active Project Leader |Former A.T. Kearney |+8Y of consulting experience | Received 7 consulting offers in the past 2Y

Dear Anonymous,

Congratulations on your final assessment step!. The structure of your presentation should be similar to the structure you would present in a case interview (remember, there is no correct structure or unique answer). I would recommend this structure, as a guide, which I had used in several projects:

1) Executive summary: key messages to give to your audience

2) Competitive landscape: this topic is broad, so present the information that is relevant for your case (demand analysis, economy, regulations, trends, competition). For instance, if laws are critical for the market you are assessing, probably this topic deserves a whole slide.

2) Proposed strategy (which takes into account the company profile, strengths, weaknesses, etc.).

- If your presentation is long, you can even develop a business plan for each function that is relevant to the firm. Otherwise, this part can go in back up

3) Projections: All critical projections to implement the business, some typical examples are financials, CAPEX (especially in mining & metals projects), labour (especially in markets where high skills labor is constrained), etc.

Other recommendations:

1) I don't know how much time do you have for your presentation but have in mind that, as a rule of thumb, 6 minutes per slide is standard for Senior Executives

2) Rehearse your presentation several times and try to record yourself. This will give you 100% confidence during the presentation

3) Try to identify ahead the critical question that the audience would ask and be prepared for them. It is better if you have back up slides for these potential questions

4) Be careful with your story telling, spelling, grammar, margins, colours, etc. Remember that in consulting the final deliverable has to be perfect.

Success in your presentation.

Regards,

Hugo

Francesco replied on 09/13/2017
Ex BCG | MBB Specialist | #1 Expert for meetings done (900+) and recommendation rate (100%)

Hi Anonymous,

I agree with Hugo; I have reported below a couple of additional elements you may want to add to the list:

  1. Goal clarification: at the beginning of the case you should verify with the client if there is a specific element as objective (eg “What’s the specific goal for entering the market – revenues, profits or anything else)
  2. Customers - in particular their segmentation and fit with our company (product/culture); you may add it in the second area mentioned by Hugo, calling it generally “Industry analysis”
  3. Feasibility of the goal:clarify if, given the capabilities of the client and the industry performance, you may be able to achieve your goal
  4. Ways to enter – that’s usually an expected area of analysis in a market entry case. Traditional ways are start from scratch, M&A or Joint Venture/Licensing

Hope this helps,

Francesco

Vlad replied on 09/17/2017
McKinsey / Accenture / More than 300 real MBB cases / Collected all Big 3 offers / Harvard Business School

Hi,

I would structure the presentation the following way:

1) Executive summary

  • Objectives
  • Context
  • Key findings

2) Market analysis

  • Size
  • Growth rates
  • Profitability
  • Segments
  • Distribution channels
  • Barriers (mainly regulation)

3) Competition

  • Market shares of competitors and their segments (see the next point)
  • Concentration/fragmentation (Fragmented market with lots of small players is less mature and easier to enter from a scratch. Concentrated market is hard to enter but has potential acquisition targets)
  • Unit economics of the players (Margins, relative cost position)
  • Key capabilities of the players (e.g. suppliers, assets, IP, etc)
  • Previous / projected entrants

4) Company

  • Unit economics (Margins, costs) in current or target markets
  • Brand
  • Product mix
  • Key capabilities

5) Opportunities to enter - a bucket summarizing:

  • Time to enter
  • Branding (Do we keep an existing brand / do sub-brand if it is the new segment or create a new brand?)
  • Existence of acquisition / licensing / JV targets if relevant
  • Cost and benefits

6) Roadmap

  • A Gantt chart with key initiatives, timeline, and milestones

7) Risks

Good luck!

Related BootCamp article(s)

Market Entry

Market Entry Strategy Frameworks may be a great solution to apply in your Case Interview if your client is searching for growth alternatives.

2 Comment(s)

Approaching a Case

In order to get into consulting, the case study is the most important element of the interview. Here, you can learn the specific skills and concepts to solve them.

7 Comment(s)

Cost-Benefit Analysis

Investments or single business cases need to be evaluated based on a certain set of criteria. Since financial performance is the key criterion in most cases you need to have an idea about future financial impacts. A key tool to asses this impact is the cost-benefit analysis which is used to determine the net effect of potential revenues and costs.

4 Comment(s)

4C Framework

Get an overview over a company’s customers, competition, cost and capabilities by conducting a 4 C analysis in your case interviews

2 Comment(s)

Related case(s)

Bain case: Asian lubricants producer

Solved 37.7k times | Rating: (4.7 / 5.0)

LubricantsCo, a very successful Asian premium producer of lubricants in their native region, would like to further increase their revenue and profit. The product range ranges from lubricants in the automotive sector (e.g. motor and gear oil) to industrial applications (e.g. fats, heavy-duty oils). ... Open whole case

Roland Berger case: Light on!

Solved 16.6k times | Rating: (4.7 / 5.0)

LumCO, a company producing injection-molded components for lighting applications, has operated successfully in its native European market. The company wants to open up one production facility each in China and the United States and establish their own distribution network in both countries to serve ... Open whole case

Nutripremium

Solved 23.8k times | Rating: (4.5 / 5.0) |

Nutripremium is a very well-known premium nutrition food company in Europe (€1 billion revenue last year). It is based in Spain and has an excellent market share not only in its home country but also in Portugal, France, Italy and Germany. Nutripremium has two main lines of products: Vitam ... Open whole case

Children vaccine

Solved 23.0k times | Rating: (4.4 / 5.0) |

Beyer, one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world, just invented a very reliable vaccine against Chickenpox, a disease that affects children in the age from 2 to 16 years. Beyer came to you wondering what their potential sales in Europe in the first year would be if they launched th ... Open whole case

Gas station

Solved 16.9k times | Rating: (4.4 / 5.0) |

How many gas stations are there in Paris? Suppose a friend of yours wants to open a gas station in Paris. What aspects should he consider? Open whole case