How do I make sure I convert my McKinsey internship to a full time offer?

and Bain BCG intern McKinsey
New answer on Mar 11, 2020
7 Answers
1.5 k Views
Anonymous A asked on Mar 07, 2020

I will be a BA intern this summer in a US office. How do I make sure I get a full time offer other than just working hard? If I'm nice and hardworking but I am not that good at making conversation or small talk, is that going to be a big problem?

For the few who do not get a return offer what is typically the reason?

(edited)

Overview of answers

Upvotes
  • Upvotes
  • Date ascending
  • Date descending
Best answer
Marco
Expert
replied on Mar 09, 2020
Associate | 3 years Experience | L.E.K. Consulting | Strategy Consulting | Extensive experience in case solving

Congrats on getting your offer. In my experience, people that do the following really stand out and typically secure a returning offer

1. Be proactive, don't wait for the project manager to give you instructions. Try to suggest things you could do and when you incur a problem, go back to your manager with a suggestion for a solution not just with the issue

2. Be precise and quality check your outputs before sending them out. Check for language, labels, anything.

3. Take notes and share them with the team as and when required

Hope it helps!
Marco

Was this answer helpful?
Francesco
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Mar 08, 2020
#1 Expert for Coaching Sessions (3.700+) | 1.300+ Reviews with 100% Recommendation Rate | Ex BCG | 8+ Years of Coaching

Hi Anonymous,

congratulations on you offer! The answers below already presented the typical dimensions assessed at the beginning of a consulting experience. Below you can find some tips related to them for your internship:

  1. Take notes when your manager tells you something – this will help you to remember details and will show you care about them to the team.
  2. Always double-check. The first impression is very important in consulting: if you show you are reliable from the beginning, you create a reputation of a reliable person. Double checks should be done on expectations for your job, your Excel analysis, your slides – basically everything.
  3. Define priorities before starting any set of tasks. The majority of the results usually come from a subset of activities – this is true also for your tasks in consulting. You have to identify which they are and prioritize them – the application of the so-called 80-20 rule or Pareto Principle. Alignment on priorities and expectations is particularly important with your manager at the beginning of the project.
  4. Socialize with your colleagues and start to build a network. Consulting is a people business and you should build a good network both within and outside the company. A good start is key to develop good relationships long-term
  5. Organize your private life activities. You want to organize your calendar to leave some space for personal activities (sport/ friends/ family). This is not easy but can be managed if you organize well, and long-term will be critical to keep a balance between work and private life. Also, it is better to align with your manager/teammates from the beginning on your core needs, so that there are no surprises later on.
  6. Ask for feedback every two-three weeks – this will show you are proactive and willing to learn.
  7. Ask for help when you don't know what to do – better to let know you are in trouble with meeting a deadline then missing the deadline.
  8. Be social and respectful with the support staff – these people are great and influential as well in the company.

Hope this helps,

Francesco

Was this answer helpful?
Robert
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Mar 07, 2020
McKinsey offers w/o final round interviews - 100% risk-free - 10+ years MBB coaching experience - Multiple book author

Hi Anonymous,

You don't need to worry too much about small talk - yes, it also might add a tiny little bit to the subjective impression. However, I love to work with brilliant introverts as opposed to mediocre extroverts.

I don't have any numbers on the reasons why interns don't get a return offer, but straight from the gut it comes back to non-excellent analytical skills and/or poor communication skills (just to be clear: with that I am NOT referring to small talk, but to clear and structured thinking and the corresponding communication of subject-matter related issues).

Hope that helps - if so, please give it a thumbs-up with the upvote button!

Robert

Was this answer helpful?
Luca
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Mar 11, 2020
BCG |NASA |20+ interviews with 100% success rate| 120+ students coached |GMAT expert 780/800 score

Hello,

First of all congratulations! In order to receive the full-time offer you have to show all those skills that are required for a good Business Analyst. Going into details, it means to:

  • Be a positive team member, trying to have a good fit with your colleagues
  • Be proactive, remember that your client is your manager: do whatever he asks for and try to anticipate his requests
  • Have a good relationship with the client, you have to gain his trust
  • Do not make mistakes, it's far better to be a bit slower than to deliver ppt or excel models with mistakes

Good luck!!
Luca

Was this answer helpful?
Anonymous updated the answer on Mar 07, 2020

Hey A,

10 years ago to be exact I was in yours shoes and did an internship in one of the top firms. Consequently I converted it into the job offer. Here are some basic recommendation for you based on my experience:

Please bear in mind that during your internship you will be assessed based on the following criteria:

  1. Analytical and problem solving skills
  2. Structure in oral and written communication (pyramidal top down communication – please read the book of Barbara Minto)
  3. Active team work
  4. Acceptation from the client side (if you work on the projects directly with clients)

In order to succeed and convert your internship into the full-time position there are some specific tips I would like to share with you:

  • Manage expectations – “undersell and overdeliver”: sit together with your mentor (superwiser) or project manager and understand what is expected from you (expectations). Don't be afraid to show yourself as a beginner without experience. This will help you to lower the expectations. For instance, work not only hard, but rather smart to deliver the real value to the team
  • Go an extra mile for the team: Go an extra mile for the team, always help your team mates. You could also organize a social event (a dinner) for your team mates – these things are always recognized by the team and your subordinate
  • Have the right mindset of the consultant: don’t think that much about your internship, but try to recognize the big picture of the projects and work you are doing and how consulting really works. Think more about how to build your career in consulting and how to get the next promotion to the Senior Consultant. If you have this kind of attitude, conversion of your internship into full-time offer will be just a formality and a matter of time.

Good luck!

André

P.S. stay hungry – stay foolish ;)

(edited)

Was this answer helpful?
0
Nathaniel
Expert
replied on Mar 07, 2020
McKinsey | BCG | CERN| University of Cambridge

Hello there,

You need to display a consultant aptitude and strive to deliver results as if you are a full-time consultant already, emphasizing the following skillset:

  • Structured problem-solving skills
  • Proactiveness and propensity to dissent
  • Top down communication
  • Deliver the highest impact (over-deliver always)

Fingers crossed you"ll get your full-time offer!

Kind regards,
Nathan

Was this answer helpful?
Clara
Expert
Content Creator
replied on Mar 07, 2020
McKinsey | Awarded professor at Master in Management @ IE | MBA at MIT |+180 students coached | Integrated FIT Guide aut

Hello!

I was also a summer BA and I remember all the nervosity we all shared about that topic: what is what makes us secure an offer?

With time and perspective, you see that it´s a very simple answer: doing things well! If you are hardworking, dedicated, good to your teams... and of course, if the outcome of your work is good, then you should be fine. Don´t think that networking or politics are an essential part, the important thing is to get the job well done.

Good luck!

Best,

Clara

Was this answer helpful?
Marco gave the best answer

Marco

Associate | 3 years Experience | L.E.K. Consulting | Strategy Consulting | Extensive experience in case solving
2
Meetings
15
Q&A Upvotes
0
Awards
2 Reviews